14 Results for

xyboard 8.2

Review

Motorola Droid Xyboard 8.2

Although thin and light, with fast 4G LTE speeds, the Motorola Droid Xyboard 8.2 is impossible for us to recommend at its current price.

By December 14, 2011

3 stars Editors' rating December 14, 2011

MSRP: $529.99

Article

Motorola Droid Xyboard 8.2 review: Stopgap or worthy Xoom successor?

Is the Motorola Droid Xyboard 8.2 a stopgap or something worth signing up for?

By December 14, 2011

Video

Motorola Droid Xyboard 8.2

The original Xoom was the first Honeycomb tablet released. Now we have Motorola's followup, the Droid Xyboard 8.2. The Xyboard is only a hair thicker than the iPad 2 and weighs less than a pound.

By December 14, 2011

Article

XyBoard tablets to launch Friday at Verizon stores

Verizon will launch Motorola's latest tablets tomorrow, according to stores in the Los Angeles area.

By December 8, 2011

Article

Verizon announces pair of Droid Xyboard tablets

Perhaps new branding can help jump-start Motorola and Verizon's next Android tablets.

By December 6, 2011

Article

Tablet Thursday: Get a Motorola Xoom 2 + 4G LTE for $219 shipped

Known stateside as the Motorola Droid Xyboard, this feature-packed tablet is available in your choice of size: 8.2 or 10.1.

By February 7, 2013

Article

iPad Mini display production slated for August, says analyst

Production of the 7.85-inch display that could find its way to a smaller iPad is expected to begin in August, according to NPD DisplaySearch.

By August 1, 2012

Article

What will the smaller iPad be called?

"iPad mini" has long been the stand-in name for the smaller iPad that's rumored to be arriving this fall. But what will Apple really name it?

By August 2, 2012

Article

Top tablets with HDMI connections

If you're looking for a tablet with an integrated HDMI output for sharing photos and videos on a TV or computer monitor, we have a roundup of CNET's top picks.

By April 19, 2012

Article

Windows and Android tablets: More bang for makers' bucks

At a crossroads when it comes to producing tablets in an ever-expanding market, PC makers should consider offering versions powered by both Windows and Android, argues The NPD Group's Ross Rubin.

By April 3, 2012