12 Results for

xiph.org

Article

Google tries freeing Web video with WebM

This story incorrectly noted the origin of the Ogg Vorbis audio format. It originated with the Xiph.Org Foundation.

By May 20, 2010

Article

Sound bite: Despite Pono's promise, experts pan HD audio

By raising $4.3 million on Kickstarter, Neil Young's startup shows an appetite for better sound quality. The only hitch: experts say there's little point going beyond CD quality.

By March 20, 2014

Article

VLC steps into next-gen video wars with VP9, HEVC support

With VLC 2.1.1, VideoLAN continues to sidestep the software patent licensing minefield of video compression. Meanwhile, open-source allies put muscle behind the new Daala codec.

By November 15, 2013

Article

How corporate bickering hobbled better Web audio

Microsoft helped create new technology for improving online audio and speech. Now the company's fighting against it. How'd that happen?

By August 17, 2012

Article

IETF standardizes Opus for flexible online audio

A multifaceted sound compression technology is now a standard, smoothing its way to use in technologies such as Web-based voice chats and videoconferencing. Next up: video?

By September 11, 2012

Article

Xiph resumes work on Ghost audio codec

Google's interest in the royalty-free Vorbis audio codec raises new possibilities for successors CELT and, in the longer run, Ghost.

By January 21, 2011

Article

Google tries freeing Web video with WebM

The Web giant has released a royalty-free video technology to counter H.264. Allies include Mozilla, Opera, and its own YouTube.

By May 19, 2010

Article

Google's WebM patent pals agree to share

Seventeen allies agree not to sue each other over WebM-related video encoding patents. Google wants to enlist more to counter MPEG LA's royalty efforts.

By April 25, 2011

Article

A logo program I can get behind

Neuros has proposed a new logo to identify DRM-free content and the devices that play it.

By December 19, 2007

Article

Is H.264 a legal minefield for video pros?

Some think license terms for the popular video encoding technology mean Apple's Final Cut Pro should be called Final Cut Hobbyist. Not so fast.

By March 1, 2010