32 Results for

waste-to-energy

Article

Merging iOS and OS X would be 'waste of energy', Apple exec says

Apple's Phil Schiller has poured water on the theory that iOS and OS X could be combined into one operating system.

By January 24, 2014

Article

Waste to energy: Green or greenwash?

A visit to a modern waste-to-energy plant shows they are far cleaner than older incinerators and an alternative to landfills, but shouldn't displace efforts to increase recycling.

By October 21, 2011

Gallery

Digging into waste-to-energy (photos)

Covanta Energy's waste-to-energy facility takes municipal solid waste and produces electricity in a less-polluting way than old-time incinerators.

5 Images By October 21, 2011

Article

Air Force base to gasify waste for energy

IST Energy's truck-sized Green Energy Machine will turn trash into electricity and heat at Air Force base in demo project.

By January 28, 2011

Gallery

Photos: Turning food waste into energy

With grants from the EPA, innovative techniques are turning food waste into energy to power this San Francisco Bay Area wastewater treatment facility.

12 Images By August 31, 2009

Article

Waste-to-energy firm Ze-gen piles up cash

Ze-gen, which has a gasification process that can transform construction debris into electricity, raises $20 million in a funding round led by a conglomerate based in Oman.

By January 13, 2009

Article

Waste-to-energy company EnerTech raises $42 million

The company converts municipal solid waste, including sewage sludge, into a solid that can be burned as fuel.

By January 8, 2008

Article

Waste-to-energy firm Ze-Gen gets $4.5 million

The company plans to open a test facility later this month which will use gasification to convert waste to electricity.

By July 16, 2007

Article

Poop-powered zoo cart a dung deal in Denver

A gasification system is set to convert more than 90 percent of the Denver Zoo's waste into energy that can, among other things, fuel a rickshaw.

By March 27, 2012

Article

U.S. missing out on energy from trash, study says

Columbia University researchers estimate 5.2 million U.S. homes could be powered annually by energy derived from non-recycled plastics, and 16.2 million from municipal solid waste.

By October 12, 2011