90 Results for

umbrellas

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Amazon keeps 'Under the Dome' under its umbrella

Its Prime Instant Video service again will exclusively stream episodes of the CBS summer sci-fi hit just four days after they air during its second season, as it did for the first.

By September 12, 2013

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Nubrella may be world's goofiest umbrella

The Nubrella, now on Kickstarter, wants to offer a hands-free rain-repelling alternative to traditional rain gear.

By July 3, 2013

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MIT to turn sky into dancing-umbrella light show

What happens when you give hundreds of strangers umbrellas fitted with multicolored LEDs? The sky gets groovy -- and maybe you learn something about networked robots.

By May 14, 2013

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Brolly umbrella leaves your thumbs free for texting

An unusual grip makes the Brolly umbrella a good wet-weather companion for people looking for shelter from the storm and a dry spot to send text messages.

By February 14, 2013

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Hacked 8-bit music umbrella rocks out as it rains

There are umbrellas, and then there are awesome geeky umbrellas that play rollicking 8-bit tunes as rain drops on them.

By July 2, 2012

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Crave giveaway: Davek Note Bag and umbrella

This we're giving away a sleek carrying case that's perfect for tablets and e-readers. And we're tossing in a stylish umbrella for good measure.

By September 2, 2011

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It's a fan. It's an umbrella. It's Fanbrella

Thanko wants to keep you cool in humid summer rain with this fan-packing rain protector.

By May 24, 2011

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Blade Runner umbrellas for the cyberpunk set

Japanese retailer Sirobako is selling Blade Runner-style LED umbrellas that light up in rainbow colors. Perfect for hunting replicants.

By June 6, 2010

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EasyWalk Umbrella Torch for dark, rainy nights

The foldable brolly with an attached flashlight has a single LED at the base of the handle to illuminate the ground you step on.

By April 15, 2010

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Air umbrella ditches the canopy

For this concept brolly, a steady stream of air is sucked in from the bottom of the shaft and then released out the top. The result is an invisible canopy of air that shields you from the downpour.

By January 13, 2010