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Article

Mad genius Colin Furze builds a hoverbike. What could go wrong?

Great Britain's most madcap inventor jumps into his infamous work shed to design and build a bike that can fly. Well, sort of.

By April 28, 2016

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Brain implant lets quadriplegic man use his own hand

A quadriplegic man is now able to play Guitar Hero, swipe a credit card and pour liquid into a glass with his own hand.

By April 13, 2016

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A future factory takes off the wheels

How the little-known startup behind the real hoverboard is literally reinventing the wheel, the rail system and a whole lot more.

By April 9, 2016

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Google's Android has too many flavors and Apple isn't the only one who thinks so

Hiroshi Lockheimer, the chief of Google's mobile software, must both fend off Apple and fight Android "fragmentation." His modus operandi: Lighten up, everyone.

By February 22, 2016

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Inside Bose's secret research lab

Bose has always taken great pride in its technical innovations and the quality of its products. But new CEO Bob Maresca is betting on a new approach to get Bose to the next level: telling people what this secretive company is all about.

By February 3, 2016

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Wearable robots for the paralyzed take a step forward

A next-gen exoskeleton, now on sale, highlights how the latest robots are merging science fiction with reality.

By February 2, 2016

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Trump isn't the only politician who says dumb things about the Net

Plenty of political figures in the US have shown a sketchy grasp of the Internet. Here's a look at some of their gaffes, past and present.

By December 31, 2015

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Short Take: Siemens invests $500 million in U.S. wireless businesses

Siemens, a global engineering and electronics firm, will spend $500 million over the next two years to enter new wireless markets in the United States. The company today formed a new internal group to consolidate its cordless phone, mobile phone and wireless networking businesses. Siemens also said it will expand its wireless research and development facilities.

April 18, 2000

Article

Standards body pans copyright law

A major Internet standards group has warned that U.S. copyright laws may chill the development of encryption and security technology. The Internet Society said in a statement that recent efforts to use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to hamper research are "misguided in the extreme." The group, which runs the Internet Engineering Task Force and other Internet standard-setting bodies, said two recent cases point to potential abuse in the enforcement of the DMCA. The group said it supports a suit brought on behalf of Princeton University professor Edward Felten, which claims the law limits free speech by criminalizing academic discussions of encryption technology. The group also criticized the FBI's arrest of Russian programmer Dimitry Sklyarov, who faces criminal charges under the DMCA for trafficking a product that circumvents anti-copying features of Adobe Systems' eBook Reader.

By September 18, 2001

Article

Standards body pans copyright law

A major Internet standards group has warned that U.S. copyright laws may chill the development of encryption and security technology. The Internet Society said in a statement that recent efforts to use the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to hamper research are "misguided in the extreme." The group, which runs the Internet Engineering Task Force and other Internet standard-setting bodies, said two recent cases point to potential abuse in the enforcement of the DMCA. The group said it supports a suit brought on behalf of Princeton University professor Edward Felten, which claims the law limits free speech by criminalizing academic discussions of encryption technology. The group also criticized the FBI's arrest of Russian programmer Dimitry Sklyarov, who faces criminal charges under the DMCA for trafficking a product that circumvents anti-copying features of Adobe Systems' eBook Reader.

By September 18, 2001