16 Results for

through-silicon vias

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How IBM is making computers more like your brain. For real

Big Blue is using the human brain as a template for breakthrough designs. Brace yourself for a supercomputer that's cooled and powered by electronic blood and small enough to fit in a backpack.

By October 17, 2013

Article

What would happen if Moore's Law did fizzle?

An end to the guiding principle of chip development would come with a whimper, not a bang. That would give us time to prepare -- and to make improvements in other areas.

By October 15, 2012

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Sun shows off its proximity communication silicon

Getting rid of the tiny wires inside computers would greatly improve performance. Sun Microsystems wants to do that with proximity communication, but it will take time.

By April 11, 2008

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Chipmakers aim to unclog data paths

Tilera's Tile64 chip, along with other cutting-edge designs, will take center stage at this week's Hot Chips conference.

By August 19, 2007

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Intel readies massive multicore processors

Researchers work to mask intricate functionality of up-to-80-core chips, so hardware and software makers can more easily adapt to them.

By June 14, 2007

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IBM connects chips for better bandwidth

Intel and others have been showing off "through-silicon vias," but IBM says it will come out with chips using the new technology next year. Photo: Closing in on TSV

By April 11, 2007

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IBM looking at new way to pass data to processor

blog The name is ungainly--Through-Silicon Vias--but the upshot is that a multitude of tiny wires would out-bandwidth overcrowded buses, making for higher-performance chips and computers.

By February 16, 2007

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Samsung stuffs 16 chips into one package

The stack of memory chips holds 16GB of memory and takes up the same amount of space formerly required for one chip.

By November 1, 2006

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Processor, memory may marry in future computers

Intel researches how to wed memory chips and processor cores, yielding impressive gains in speed and efficiency.

By September 28, 2006