20 Results for

tera-electron-volts

Article

LHC takes a step closer to full power

Large Hadron Collider circulates beams at 3.5 tera-electron-volts, bringing it closer to CERN's goal of conducting research into fundamental physics.

By March 19, 2010

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CERN's collider sets proton speed record

The recently restarted Large Hadron Collider has become the world's most powerful particle accelerator, after setting a new record for beam intensity.

By November 30, 2009

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Hadron collider ready for lengthy run

CERN is set to run its giant particle collider for 18 to 24 months at a modest power level as it continues to check out the machinery.

By February 5, 2010

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Hints of new physics postpone LHC upgrade

Chance of discovering new physical phenomena with Large Hadron Collider particle accelerator leads CERN to postpone energy-doubling upgrade.

By February 1, 2011

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LHC's record intensity speeds Higgs search

Squeezing more bunches of protons onto the particle accelerator's beams increases the data-gathering rate--and the odds the Higgs boson will turn up at CERN.

By April 22, 2011

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A longer delay for the Large Hadron Collider

The world's largest physics experiment has seen a series of setbacks since September, but CERN is determined that "the LHC will run next year."

By November 30, 2008

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Scientists unveil plans for 19-mile-long particle smasher

The blueprints are ready. If it gets funded, the multibillion-dollar International Linear Collider could help solve the mystery of cosmic dark matter.

By June 12, 2013

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Higgs boson theory nets Nobel for pair of physicists

The prestigious award goes to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs, who a half-century ago independently proposed what became the Higgs boson, discovered in 2012.

By October 8, 2013

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What makes the LHC tick?

Large Hadron Collider engineers are ironing out wrinkles in a tremendously complicated machine that consumes about the same power as all Geneva.

By July 6, 2010

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Shockfossils: 5 million volts of electric art

Electrons gone wild burn their way through acrylic slabs to create Shockfossils, branching works of art that capture the raw power of electricity.

By February 21, 2012