19 Results for

syngas

Article

Waste Management inks another trash-to-treasure deal

Genomatica partners with Waste Management to develop chemical products from syngas, the companies announce last week.

By February 16, 2011

Article

The nitty-gritty details of the Bloom Energy box

Bloom Energy CEO K.R. Sridhar spells out how the fuel cell works.

By February 25, 2010

Article

Air Force base to gasify waste for energy

IST Energy's truck-sized Green Energy Machine will turn trash into electricity and heat at Air Force base in demo project.

By January 28, 2011

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Coffee-powered car buzzes past speed record

Do you need coffee to get going every morning? So does this car, which this month broke a Guinness World Record "for vehicles run on gas from organic waste."

By September 26, 2011

Article

GE inks deal for 'cleaner coal' in China

Timed with Obama's visit, GE announces deals in China around high-speed rail, hybrid locomotives, and coal gasification plants with underground carbon storage.

By November 17, 2009

Article

Poop-powered zoo cart a dung deal in Denver

A gasification system is set to convert more than 90 percent of the Denver Zoo's waste into energy that can, among other things, fuel a rickshaw.

By March 27, 2012

Article

Waste Management invests in trash-to-energy tech

The trash-hauling giant creates a joint venture called S4 Energy Solutions to build plasma gasification systems that convert separated industrial wastes into electricity and liquid fuels.

By May 21, 2009

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Waste Management CEO places energy bets

The garbage hauler is investing in start-ups to wring valuable products from waste, including electricity, liquid fuels, and chemicals.

By April 4, 2011

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Termite stomach bug to make ethanol

Start-up ZeaChem raises $34 million to build a cellulosic ethanol plant that uses the microbes in termites' guts, rather than genetically designed specialty bugs.

By January 7, 2009

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Green chemicals company Genomatica files for IPO

Genomatica looks to raise $100 million with a process for converting sugars, rather than oil, into chemicals used in everyday products.

By August 24, 2011