497 Results for

sphere

Review

LaCie Christofle Sphere

The LaCie Christofle Sphere is definitely not a storage device that you need, but rather something you want for its great look and fast performance.

By February 11, 2014

4 stars Editors' rating February 11, 2014

MSRP: $490.00

Article

'Sphere' looks past stellar glare to find exoplanets

A device known as "Sphere," attached to the Very Large Telescope in Chile, has achieved first light using three novel methods to peek into the brightness.

By June 4, 2014

Article

Saturn's tiny moon Prometheus is a ring wrecking ball

Saturn has an oddly shaped little moon that enjoys carving arcs out of one of the planet's picturesque rings. An image just released by NASA highlights that behavior.

By July 6, 2015

Article

Spheree lets you watch animated images in full 3D

Like a crystal ball, Spheree contains a projected 3D image that you can interact with and move around.

By August 25, 2014

Article

Capture 360-degree panoramas with Google Photo Sphere for iOS

Learn how to use the app that's been a popular Android staple for some time.

By August 21, 2014

Article

Google launches Photo Sphere app on iOS

The search company is bringing the app that takes 360-degree photos to its rival mobile platform -- in line with Google's desire to expand its photo products.

By August 19, 2014

Article

St. Louis Cardinals may have hacked baseball rival Houston Astros, report says

Technically Incorrect: Officials of the Cardinals, one of baseball's most consistently successful teams, have reportedly been subpoenaed for allegedly using nefarious means to get player information.

By June 16, 2015

Article

Peel back the layers on the biology of an egg

Appliance Science takes a look at what makes up that most humble of kitchen staples, the common egg.

By June 16, 2015

Article

22 essential IFTTT recipes for Twitter

Keep a log of all your tweets, automatically create lists and tweet constantly.

By May 30, 2015

Article

That next-gen antenna? It may be printed right onto your shirt

Using an exotic form of carbon called graphene, researchers print antennas on paper and other materials with a process that could bring network links to many cheap devices.

By May 19, 2015