104 Results for



Six Million Dollar Plant: Scientists grow cyborg roses

A team of researchers has created living rose plants with electronic circuits threaded through their veins.

By November 22, 2015


Cutting-edge 3D printer prints in 10 materials simultaneously

MIT engineers have built a 3D printer that can print in 10 different materials at once, streamlining the manufacturing process.

By August 24, 2015


Space, swords, bones: 3D printing (literally) makes our world

Forget those silly little figurines. The real work in 3D printing will go into things that matter, like bone grafts, full-size bridges -- even a building on the moon.

By August 8, 2015


Meet Logitech's new Logi-branded Blok iPad cases

The square-cornered Logi Blok iPad cases come in three different versions, including a keyboard case for the iPad Air 2.

By July 15, 2015


Bionic eye: 3D printing merges contact lens and QLEDs

Quantum dots have been successfully 3D printed into a contact lens, allowing the lens to project beams of light.

By December 10, 2014


Polymer dollars: Fingering Canada's plastic bills

The new polymer $20 now in circulation may look and feel fake, but it's designed to stop counterfeiting.

By December 2, 2012


Plant-based gel can stop traumatic bleeding in seconds

Biotech startup Suneris has developed a plant-based polymer it says functions like "Lego building blocks for the body," drastically reducing the amount of time it takes to stop a wound from bleeding.

By November 20, 2014


Swallowing this needle-studded pill could be good for you

Researchers develop a pill that could be swallowed to deliver drugs directly into our digestive tracts via tiny needles. And that's better how?

By October 1, 2014


Flying across the blood-brain barrier with microbubbles

Long an obstacle to treating diseases like brain cancer, Parkinson's, and Alzheimer's, the blood-brain barrier might soon be unlocked thanks to a medical physicist in Canada.

By June 18, 2014


Origami unfolds a new world of shape-shifting electronics

Researchers are using the geometry of paper folding to come up with futuristic antennas that can retract and compress.

By May 22, 2014