10 Results for

phase-change memory

Article

IBM, SK Hynix team up for PCRAM work

The companies will develop phase-change random access memory, an advance for memory chips that will allow storage of high data volumes, according to the Korea Times.

By June 12, 2012

Article

IBM leaps two hurdles for next-gen memory

Big Blue finds a way to double the data that a cell of phase-change memory can store for a long time. It expects the new memory technology in servers in 2016.

By June 29, 2011

Article

Intel's next-gen memory closer to reality

Intel and Numonyx announced practical advancements they believe will make phase-change memory meet its performance and capacity promise.

By October 28, 2009

Article

Samsung: PRAM to push mobile battery life

Will flash eventually give way to phase-change random access memory? Samsung is hopeful as it begins manufacturing, but there's still a ways to go.

By September 29, 2009

Article

After 38 years, a new type of memory to hit market

Phase change memory could actually make its debut later this year. It's only taken decades to wring out the problems.

By March 31, 2008

Article

Flash memory replacement coming this year?

Phase-change memory chips (ovonics) have been a long time in the works. With the help of Intel and STMicroelectronics, their time may be soon.

By August 9, 2007

Article

Nanochip promises cheaper, denser flash memory replacement

Crossbreed a millipede and phase change and what do you get? This chip, which is expected to be released in 2010.

By August 1, 2007

Article

Intel doubles data density on possible flash successor

The chipmaker and ST come up with phase change memory that can hold more than one bit per cell--but it's still not out.

By February 5, 2008

Article

Infineon, IBM collaborate on new memory tech

The two companies will research phase-change memory, material that retains data by changing its structure.

By May 23, 2005

Article

Photo: Measuring memory

Philips researchers use alternative materials to create and test "phase change memory," which would work like a CD or DVD.

March 16, 2005