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Meet the parasite that can burrow its way into the human eye

A 19-year-old college student in England contracted a microscopic parasite called Acanthamoeba that started eating her left eye. The other scary part: how she got it.

By May 27, 2015


The microscopic parasite helping to solve astronaut bone density loss

A tiny roundworm is being studied in space in a bid to observe precisely what happens to muscle mass under zero-G conditions.

By January 12, 2015


Intel's Edison joins the quest to save the bees

Tiny radio-frequency identification chips attached to bees will be paired with Intel Edison boards to monitor the bees' activities and help the fight against colony collapse disorder.

By August 24, 2015


Could Viagra make it harder to spread malaria?

The drug that comes in a little blue pill could help keep malaria contained by stiffening up the parasite that causes it, say researchers.

By May 16, 2015


Eeww: iPhone microscope spots parasitic worm eggs

An iPhone outfitted with a cheap ball lens showed 70 percent sensitivity in finding worm eggs.

By March 14, 2013


Sub-$1 3D-printed microscope turns phones into science tools

Your next great scientific discovery is a 3D printer and less than $1 worth of materials away when you print your own smartphone microscope.

By September 18, 2014


Anti-missile tech could help combat malaria

Heat-seeking technology developed for the military's Javelin missile program might soon be used to save rather than destroy.

By July 17, 2014


Are selfies causing the spread of head lice?

A lice-removal professional claims selfies are contributing to an increase in the spread of head lice among young people, but for now at least, the link is by no means conclusive.

By February 24, 2014


Researchers bypass blood work, favoring lasers to detect malaria

Using the same tech a destroyer uses to detect a submarine, a new diagnostic tool listens for the sound of popping vapor nanobubbles -- a telltale sign that malaria parasites are dining.

By January 8, 2014


CSIRO puts backpacks on bees to study colony collapse

The CSIRO is fitting bees with tiny sensors so that it can monitor and study the drastically diminishing bee population.

By January 14, 2014