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Zombie-head lollipops let you lick your fear

With Halloween coming up, these creepy lollipops being sold on Etsy make great treats -- or tricks.

By October 20, 2015


I had my brain scanned by a computer and all I got was this lousy T-shirt

Clothing brand Uniqlo has a new feature: a brain-wave-reading device that will pick a T-shirt based on your mood. But does it work? CNET's Nic Healey decided to investigate.

By October 8, 2015


Marijuana might not be shrinking your brain after all, study says

Decreased brain volume in pot users may have more to do with genetic predisposition than casual use, a study says. Is that why stoners remember what time "SpongeBob SquarePants" airs?

By August 28, 2015


Miniature brain-in-a-dish could help advance Alzheimer's research

A lab-grown brain is the most complete ever developed, equivalent to the brain maturity of a five-week-old foetus.

By August 19, 2015


F-U-N-D-E-D: Disney ups investments in mind-reading tech

Media and advertising companies turn to brain science to help deliver content you won't forget.

By August 14, 2015


Your music taste might reveal how your brain works

Do you like the sweet sounds of Billie Holiday or the hard edge of Metallica? A new study from the University of Cambridge says your choice shows whether you're an empathetic or systematic thinker.

By July 22, 2015


Lack of sleep makes it harder to read people's faces

Researchers find that your brain must work overtime to see how other people are feeling when you're running on less sleep -- and not because you have trouble keeping your eyes open.

By July 16, 2015


F-U-N-D-E-D: Eyeing innovation, Disney sees big future in tiny companies

The media giant's focus on fledgling startups comes as US companies increasingly play the role of venture capitalists.

By July 10, 2015


Using intentions to control a robotic prosthetic

A neural implant on the area of the brain that controls the patient's intention to move could be the key to better robotic prosthetics.

By May 21, 2015


It's easy to make your brain think it's in someone else's body

By messing with the brain's sense of location, a team of researchers in Sweden figure out how make people believe they're wearing each other's bodies.

By May 5, 2015