12 Results for

neurobiology

Article

Flies run on tiny treadmills, watch videos for science

Stanford scientists set flies up on a fly-sized treadmill, showed them videos, and discovered a common thread between the insects and humans.

By January 27, 2014

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Monkeys move virtual arms with their minds

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have enabled rhesus monkeys to move a pair of arms in a virtual environment using just their brain activity.

By November 7, 2013

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A little black dress that speaks to schizophrenia

U.K. design students fashion powerful garments that aim to explain the neuroscientific underpinnings of bipolar disorder, epilepsy, autism, Alzheimer's, and more.

By April 5, 2013

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Gates Foundation offers $100k for 'next-gen condom'

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation believes that if condoms actually felt better to use, global health could improve substantially.

By March 22, 2013

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Could Mars voyage cause Alzheimer's in astronauts?

Research into space radiation exposure suggests new risk to long-distance astronauts -- symptoms of dementia.

By January 3, 2013

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On the Moore's Law hot seat: Intel's Mike Mayberry (Q&A)

This Intel vice president lives 10 years in the chip technology future, charting a course for the computing industry and transforming research ideas into high-volume manufacturing.

By October 15, 2012

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IBM says new chip mimics the human brain

Big Blue's new cognitive computing chips are designed to combine "digital neurons" and "on-chip synapses" and could enable applications that tackle some of the thorniest problems in computing.

By August 17, 2011

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Study to test human ability to control robotics with the mind

University researchers win DARPA funding to test a tiny, 10x10 array of electrodes implanted on the brain to help move robotic arms.

By February 17, 2011

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Sniff-activated system drives wheelchairs

A system out of Israel lets the severely disabled navigate wheelchairs, surf the Net, or communicate with others via a pattern of inhalations and exhalations.

By July 27, 2010

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Brain network scanning may predict injury's effects

Resting-state functional connectivity, originally developed to study brain organization, also reveals the health or damage of brain networks, according to neurologists at Washington University.

By March 23, 2010