53 Results for

nanotube

Article

First carbon nanotube computer to help extend Moore's Law?

Stanford researchers have created a basic system that shuns silicon in favor of imperfect lines of carbon atoms that could one day deliver even more performance and efficiency than current technology.

By Sep. 25, 2013

Article

Carbon nanotube Cupid perfect for tiny crushes

This teeny-weeny expression of love can't fail to impress. Just be sure to include a microscope.

By Feb. 13, 2013

Gallery

IBM's self-assembling nanotube chip tech (pictures)

Big Blue has developed a way to use a combination of chip patterns and chemical bonding to precisely place carbon nanotubes on computer chips. Here's a look at some of the technology involved.

10 Images By Oct. 28, 2012

Article

Carbon nanotube pencil points to hazardous gases

MIT boffins create a new type of pencil lead that can draw hazardous-gas-detecting sensors on paper. Just don't bring it to the SAT.

By Oct. 10, 2012

Article

IBM brings carbon nanotube-based computers a step closer

Helping the hunt for something to replace silicon transistors, Big Blue researchers have found a way to precisely place carbon nanotubes -- or rather, to encourage them to place themselves.

By Oct. 28, 2012

Article

IBM: Tiny carbon nanotube transistor outshines silicon

In the pursuit of smaller transistors, IBM Research found that carbon nanotubes outperform silicon on speed and power consumption, offering a possible way to maintain the pace of Moore's Law.

By Jan. 30, 2012

Article

Porous nanotube 'forests' catch cancer cells

A microfluidic device with porous nanotube forests can catch tumor cells and viruses, and could be used in developing countries.

By Mar. 28, 2011

Article

Nanotube ink turns paper into batteries

Stanford researchers coat paper with carbon nanotubes and silver nanowires to serve as electricity storage devices. Go ahead, crumple it.

By Dec. 9, 2009

Article

Carbon nanotube carpet darkest thing ever made

Scientists from Rice University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute figured out a way to trap light efficiently with nanotubes; 99.955 percent of the light that hits gets absorbed.

By Jan. 22, 2008

Article

UC Berkeley creates radio out of a nanotube

Radio, made out of a single carbon nanotube about 10,000 times thinner than a human hair, runs on batteries and requires headphones.

By Oct. 31, 2007