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Watch a man sing 'If I Only Had a Brain' filmed on new super-fast MRI

Thanks to magnetic resonance imaging at 100 frames per second, researchers can watch the muscles involved in singing in action.

By April 21, 2015


Birth month may correlate to some diseases (bad news, October)

Columbia University scientists find correlations between certain birth months and the risk of contracting 55 diseases. Because birthdays aren't depressing enough on their own.

By June 8, 2015


The case of the incredible shrinking Swiss cheese holes

A Swiss agriculture lab finds that the modern process of cheese making is making Swiss cheese look less Swiss cheesy.

By May 29, 2015


Woman's donated leg mummified using ancient Egyptian practice

Using two legs from a cadaver, researchers in Switzerland baked one in an oven and covered the other in a salt solution to try to re-create ancient mummification. One method was successful.

By May 27, 2015


​So you think you can't sing? Science says otherwise

Grab a mic! Most people can carry a tune, even if they think their voice would make Simon Cowell scowl, a researcher at Toronto's Royal Conservatory of Music says.

By May 22, 2015


It's easy to make your brain think it's in someone else's body

By messing with the brain's sense of location, a team of researchers in Sweden figure out how make people believe they're wearing each other's bodies.

By May 5, 2015


Using electricity to give your brain a boost? Not so fast...

Do-it-yourselfers using electrical currents to stimulate their brains may be doing more harm than good.

By May 6, 2015


Mystery solved: Why do knuckles crack?

For the first time, an MRI video has been taken of cracking knuckles, answering once and for all what makes the audible pop.

By April 15, 2015


One reason you can't stop snacking late at night

Brains are less stimulated by food at night, a Brigham Young University study shows. And that, ironically, is exactly what leads to those midnight food cravings.

By May 5, 2015


Physicists inch toward atomic-scale MRI

Researchers are improving the first nanoscale MRI technique developed at MIT in 2009 in the hopes of imaging such biological samples as viruses at extremely high resolution.

By September 27, 2013