248 Results for

moore's law

Article

Moore's Law is the reason your iPhone is so thin and cheap

Intel co-founder Gordon Moore's observation 50 years ago set the groundwork for self-driving cars on the road and computers in our pockets today.

By April 16, 2015

Gallery

Visiting the places that make Moore's Law happen (pictures)

CNET went to Intel's research hub in Hillsboro, Ore., and GlobalFoundries' factory in Malta, N.Y., to see the facilities developing tomorrow's chips. Intel, the world's largest chipmaker, has spent more than $25 billion building up six campuses in Oregon. GlobalFoundries, owned by the government of Abu Dhabi's investment arm, spent $10 billion creating its new Malta facility.

26 Images By April 16, 2015

Video

The hefty price of keeping up with Moore's Law

CNET's Bridget Carey and Ben Fox Rubin discuss how Moore's Law sets the pace for all technology today and what can happen if a company doesn't keep up.

By April 16, 2015

Article

Samsung, in a race to build your next smartphone chip, may just win

The Korean electronics maker, best known for TVs and mobile devices, also makes the processors powering those devices. Here's why it's now angling to be first with new chip technology.

By April 17, 2015

Article

Google on cloud storage pricing: 'Follow Moore's Law'

Google gets more serious about taking on the likes of Amazon Web Services, slashing on-demand rates by as much as 85 percent.

By March 25, 2014

Article

Intel CEO takes on Apple A7, cites 'Moore's Law advantage'

Responding to an analyst's question, Intel CEO waxes eloquent about the advantage of Intel's manufacturing technology compared with Apple's.

By October 16, 2013

Article

Inside the multibillion-dollar quest to make faster, cheaper gadgets

Intel, GlobalFoundries and other chipmakers have built massive facilities to manufacture more powerful computer chips. It's all part of a race to prove they can keep pace with Moore's Law.

By April 16, 2015

Article

First carbon nanotube computer to help extend Moore's Law?

Stanford researchers have created a basic system that shuns silicon in favor of imperfect lines of carbon atoms that could one day deliver even more performance and efficiency than current technology.

By September 25, 2013

Article

Adios, silicon: Why exotic designs are the future for the chips in your gadgets

Decades of progress creating conventional computer chips will stall in the coming years, forcing some far-out ideas on semiconductor makers. Carbon nanotubes or quantum computing, anyone?

By April 17, 2015

Article

End of Moore's Law: It's not just about physics

A DARPA director argues that the end of the Moore's Law -- which is essentially why you now have a tablet in your hand -- could come about because of insurmountable economic challenges.

By August 28, 2013