16 Results for

microfluidics

Article

IBM microfluidics tech designed to improve cancer diagnosis

A technique to pump tiny amounts of marker fluids onto a test sample could enable many more tests during a biopsy and therefore a better understanding of a person's cancer.

By October 22, 2013

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Game-changing $5 chemistry set inspired by music box

A Stanford researcher reinvents the chemistry set completely in the form of an inexpensive gizmo modeled after a hand-crank music box.

By April 10, 2014

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Plucking cancer cells from blood via microfluidics

A new gadget can capture and culture circulating cancer cells shed by a tumor, providing important data about cancer progression and how patients respond to treatment.

By April 25, 2012

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Microfluidic chip to quickly diagnose the flu

Researchers miniaturize a more expensive diagnostic test into a single-use microfluidic chip roughly the size of a miscroscope slide.

By March 29, 2012

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Tiny rocket ships drive into human cells, could deliver drugs

Researchers at Penn State University explore the insides of our cells with nano-sized, rocket-shaped metal projectiles powered by sound.

By February 10, 2014

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Scientists inch closer to blood test for pancreatic cancer

Without any screening tests, pancreatic cancer is rarely diagnosed early, and has become the fourth-leading cause of cancer deaths in the US. Steve Jobs died of it at the age of 56 in 2011.

By January 22, 2014

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How IBM is making computers more like your brain. For real

Big Blue is using the human brain as a template for breakthrough designs. Brace yourself for a supercomputer that's cooled and powered by electronic blood and small enough to fit in a backpack.

By October 17, 2013

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A keyboard that rises up from flat touch screens

A startup creates a physical keyboard for touch-screen devices, like smartphones or tablets, that appears when you need to type and disappears when you're done. CNET's Sumi Das tries it out.

By February 13, 2013

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Nanotech device could step in for dogs to sniff out explosives

Scientists say their tech is inspired by the canine olfactory mucus layer, which absorbs and then concentrates airborne molecules.

By November 20, 2012

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Everyday office paper tests for pregnancy, medical conditions

Researchers hope to make not just cheap but nearly free medical tests using paper that can stick to certain molecules.

By October 3, 2012