10 Results for

lotuslive

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LotusLive Engage: IBM's cloud gets social

Collaboration and communication in an innovative new package. The second coming of Lotus Notes? Not exactly but IBM is hoping it has the same impact in the enterprise.

By Mar. 31, 2009

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IBM steps up cloud collaboration services

Big Blue unveils new service that allows users to connect to cloud collaboration tools and social networks for $10 per month.

By Oct. 5, 2010

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IBM to launch cloud-based e-mail service

Big Blue enters the cloud-email game with its new LotusLive iNotes service, which will cost $3.75 per month per user.

By Oct. 1, 2009

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IBM grabs largest enterprise cloud deployment

Big Blue notches another 100,000 seats of LotusLive as Panasonic goes all-in with cloud services.

By Jan. 13, 2010

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IBM opens new cloud lab while Microsoft reorgs

Big Blue continues to be the only enterprise vendor bringing cloud services to its customer. A new lab in Hong Kong will focus on emerging markets and applications.

By Dec. 10, 2009

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IBM helps students put their heads in the cloud

The IBM Cloud Academy, announced at the Educause annual conference, is designed to help educational institutes collaborate via a cloud-based infrastructure.

By Nov. 4, 2009

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IBM and Canonical team up against Windows 7

The companies are bringing their low-cost cloud and Linux desktop platform to the U.S. Even if customers don't bite immediately, Microsoft needs to be concerned.

By Oct. 20, 2009

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IBM launches new Netbook software in Africa

IBM partners with Canonical to unveil new Netbook software package that uses a Linux-based operating system and cloud computing.

By Sep. 23, 2009

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IBM software sticks to the plan for 2010

Steve Mills, Big Blue's software chief, sits down with CNET to discuss the company's view on cloud computing and open source in the new year.

By Jan. 4, 2010

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Salesforce.com: Pondering the next 10 years

The mission will be to build new areas beyond CRM. Of course, Salesforce.com would be a fine subsidiary of an enterprise software giant like SAP or Oracle.

By Mar. 16, 2009