117 Results for

long-distance service

Article

Get an Obihai OBi200 voice-over-IP adapter for $34.99

From the Cheapskate: This little gizmo pairs with Google Voice but it's compatible with other VoIP providers, and it promises free (or at least dirt-cheap) phone service forever.

By June 16, 2016

Article

Qwest seeks OK on long-distance service

Qwest Communications International announced Thursday that it filed for permission with the Federal Communications Commission to offer long-distance phone service in five of the 14 states where it already provides local service. The telecom carrier is seeking regulatory approval to offer service in Colorado, Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska and North Dakota, and will file for permission in the nine other states in its territory during the summer and fall. Qwest expects the FCC to OK the company's first federal application for long-distance service within 90 days. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 requires incumbent phone companies, or Baby Bells, to show that they have opened their local networks to competitors in exchange for the authority to offer long-distance service. Qwest is the only Baby Bell that has not received long-distance approval in its territory.

June 13, 2002

Article

Qwest closer to long-distance approval

Qwest Communications International said Wednesday that it passed a series of tests that will allow the telecommunications carrier to start applying for government permission to offer long-distance phone service within its 14-state territory. The company said that a final report compiled by an independent administrator indicates that Qwest has adequately opened its network in 13 states. The company already met requirements in Arizona. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 requires incumbent phone companies, or Baby Bells, to show that they have opened their local networks to competitors in exchange for permission to offer long-distance service. The Denver-based company plans to file by mid-June with the Federal Communications Commission for long-distance approval in five states and expects to receive the government's blessing within 90 days after the filing of each application. Qwest is the only Baby Bell that has not received long-distance approval in its territory, which covers part of the western United States. BellSouth, Verizon Communications and SBC Communications have all gained the green light to offer service within some of their states.

May 29, 2002

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BellSouth wins long-distance green light

BellSouth announced Wednesday that the Federal Communications Commission will allow the company to offer long-distance phone service in Georgia and Louisiana. Under the Telecommunications Act of 1996, incumbent phone companies must prove they have opened local networks to competitors in exchange for offering long-distance service. BellSouth joins other former "Baby Bell" companies such as Verizon Communications and SBC Communications in offering long-distance services. Verizon won approval in six states and is waiting for the FCC to rule on applications in two other states. SBC offers long-distance service in five states. Qwest Communications International expects to apply for permission to offer long-distance service later this year.

May 15, 2002

Article

Verizon wins Vermont long-distance

Verizon Communications announced Wednesday that the Federal Communications Commission has granted it permission to offer long-distance phone service in Vermont. The Baby Bell phone carrier is the dominant provider of local phone service in the Northeast. Under the Telecommunications Act of 1996, incumbent phone companies must prove they have opened their local networks to competitors in exchange for offering long-distance service. Verizon has also gained long-distance approval in New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. The company expects the FCC to rule on its applications for New Jersey and Maine by the end of June. Verizon will start long-distance service to Vermont consumers later this month.

April 17, 2002

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Verizon files for long-distance in Maine

Verizon Communications filed for approval with the Federal Communications Commission to offer long-distance phone service in the state of Maine, the company announced Thursday. As part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, Baby Bell phone companies that offer local service must prove they have opened their local networks to competitors to enter the long-distance market. The FCC has 90 days to review the application and will receive input from the Maine Public Utilities Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice before making a final decision. Verizon has already received long-distance approval in New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts, and has also filed in Vermont. But the company withdrew its application in New Jersey this week because of concerns raised over a charge the company bills other carriers.

March 21, 2002

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SBC asks for long-distance OK in Illinois

SBC Communications said Tuesday that it filed for approval to offer long-distance phone service in Illinois with the Illinois Commerce Commission (ICC), a state regulatory agency. SBC expects the state review of its application will last until mid-2002, and, if approved, the telecommunications carrier will then file with the Federal Communications Commission for final approval. The ICC will work with KPMG, an independent contractor, to determine if SBC has opened up its local phone networks to competitors in accordance with the Telecommunications Act of 1996. SBC has gained FCC approval in the past to offer long-distance service in Arkansas, Missouri, Texas, Kansas and Oklahoma. Other carriers such as Qwest Communications International, Verizon and BellSouth are also seeking approval to offer long-distance service in their territories, a move that provides another source of revenue for the "baby Bell" phone companies.

November 27, 2001

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Qwest strives for long-distance market

Phone service carrier Qwest Communications International discloses plans to re-enter the long-distance market in the aftermath of its merger with Baby Bell US West.

April 10, 2001

Article

Replace your landline with $199 Ooma Telo

Normally $249, this VoIP replacement for your home phone service provides unlimited long-distance and good basic-calling features--without the monthly bill.

By July 12, 2010

Article

Long-distance: Elevated earnings or eventual erosion?

Even as the top three long-distance companies look to separate themselves from that eroding business, Baby Bells see in the service an entirely new revenue stream.

October 30, 2000