3 Results for

iuma

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iUMA

Access the UMA Investment Service anywhere anytime. Advisers and Accountholders simply use your Ords online ID and password to access iUMA's many...

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Microscopy&Microanalysis 2014

This is the official app of the Microscopy & Microanalysis 2014 Annual Meeting. (The IUMAS-6 meeting is being held in conjunction with M&M 2014 and...

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Exposure Tool

Long time exposure photography involves using a long-duration shutter speed to sharply capture the stationary elements of images while blurring,...

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MSN Unsigned seems half-hearted

If MSN were serious about giving unsigned musicians a shot at fame, it wouldn't launch a site like this.

By December 2, 2008

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Hello? Is this thing on?

Welcome to Digital Noise, a blog about music and technology.

By June 13, 2007

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IUMA buyer launches subscription service

Digital-music provider Vitaminic says it has launched an online music subscription service, dubbed Vitaminic Music Club. The service will provide music fans with unlimited access to legally downloadable tracks from artists including Duke Ellington and Frank Sinatra. The company said the subscription will run $39.95 for six months or $69.95 for a year. In January, Vitaminic partnered with Sony Music Entertainment to let consumers purchase secure, downloadable music. Two months later, Vitaminic inked a deal to acquire the Internet Underground Music Archive (IUMA), including its domains, artist databases, equipment and the registered trademark, Musicomania, which was owned by EMusic.

April 11, 2001

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IUMA back online

Venerable independent artist Web site IUMA (Independent Underground Music Archive) is back in full operation, after being bought by Italian music company Vitaminic. The site, one of the first music sites on the Web, had been mostly shut down by struggling parent EMusic. Vitaminic said it would once again accept new artists to the site and fulfill previous revenue-sharing promises made to artists. Independent music sites have had a hard time surviving the downturn in venture funding. Riffage.com went under late last year, while Epitonic.com remained online only after finding a buyer.

By April 6, 2001

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Digital music provider buys IUMA

The Internet Underground Music Archive signs a deal to be acquired by digital music provider Vitaminic, giving life support to the Net music veteran.

March 23, 2001

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Short Take: EMusic, IUMA integrate, launch redesign

The Internet Underground Music Archive (IUMA), a veteran music site that lets unsigned bands promote and sell their music online, has completed its integration with EMusic.com and has launched a redesigned site. IUMA's new site features a search interface for finding music and information about emerging artists, as well as the recently debuted Artist Uplink, which allows artists to upload biographies, photos, tour dates, images, artwork, songs, and lyrics.

September 15, 1999

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Short Take: GoodNoise to acquire IUMA

Music download site GoodNoise said it will acquire the Internet Underground Music Archive (IUMA), a veteran music site that lets unsigned bands promote and sell their music online. IUMA, online since 1993, hosts more than 3,500 band sites, GoodNoise said. Following the all-stock deal, expected to close in June, IUMA will be a wholly owned subsidiary of GoodNoise, which soon will change its name to Emusic.com, the company said.

May 17, 1999

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MP3.com halts free artist-royalty program

Another free ride is coming to an end for Web music, only this time it's the musicians who stand to lose out.

By March 16, 2001

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Web's oldest music site could become history

The Internet Underground Music Archive, possibly the oldest major music site on the Net, is on life support, looking for last-minute financial rescue.

By February 8, 2001

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EMusic prepares layoffs, restructuring

The Web site, which sells direct digital downloads of music, says it will lay off more than a third of its staff as part of a new round of restructuring.

By January 12, 2001