5728 Results for

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Article

Lab grows blood for human trials

Human volunteers in the near future will test out blood created from engineered stem cells. Someday facilities could make type O on demand, like real-life Tru Blood factories.

By Apr. 15, 2014

Article

Mapping the human face in 900 megapixels

A custom robotic camera that snapped 600 images over the course of half an hour captures detailed portraits of the face that show eyelashes, stray hairs, and pores in all their macro glory.

By Mar. 21, 2014

Article

Lab-made mini human to screen drugs, toxins

Work begins on Athena, a $19 million project that seeks to create artificial organs that work in concert inside a human-like test dummy that could reduce reliance on animal testing.

By Mar. 26, 2014

Article

Bot or not? Try to tell a human poet from a computer

The Bot or Not Web site, called a "Turing test for poetry," lets users guess whether poems have been penned by a human or an algorithm. It's not always easy.

By Mar. 10, 2014

Article

Augmented-reality contact lenses to be human-ready at CES

While Google works to bring a polished Glass device to market, wearables startup Innovega is taking head-mounted displays a step further: contact lenses that interact with full HD glasses.

By Jan. 3, 2014

Article

Stanford scientists 'eavesdrop' on the human brain

A new method of recording brain activity affords scientists unprecedented monitoring -- and yes, it involves temporarily removing a portion of a patient's skull to insert packets of electrodes.

By Oct. 15, 2013

Article

Crave Ep. 150: Will dogs speak human in 2014?

No More Woof is a wearable brainwave-reading headband for dogs that can interpret up to four neural patterns and voice them in human-speak.

By Dec. 20, 2013

Video

Will dogs speak human in 2014?, Ep. 150

No More Woof is a wearable brainwave-reading headband for dogs that can interpret up to four neural patterns and voice them in human-speak.

By Dec. 20, 2013

Video

A hybrid insect-human camera lens

This footage was shot with a tiny prototype lens being developed at Ohio State University. It combines features of insect eye lenses, such as their wide angle of view, with those of a human eye, such as the ability to shift the focus. Here, the lens focuses on letters positioned at various distances to demonstrate depth of field.

By Sep. 20, 2013

Article

What the tech business hasn't yet grasped about human nature

Genevieve Bell, Intel's in-house anthropologist, sees constants in our behavior that could mean big bucks for businesses that find a way to capitalize on them.

By Feb. 25, 2014