30 Results for

holocaust

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Petition circulates to get Pokemon Go out of the Holocaust Museum

The hit mobile game uses Washington's Holocaust Museum as a featured location. This petition asks developer Niantic to remove it.

By July 13, 2016

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Holocaust Museum asks visitors to cool it with the Pokemon Go

Calling the game inappropriate for a memorial to the victims of Nazism, Washington's Holocaust Museum asks visitors to stop playing Pokemon Go.

By July 12, 2016

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Hiroshima wants Pokemon Go players to go away

Officials from the Japanese city worry the search for Pikachu could disrupt an annual ceremony remembering victims of the first atomic bomb.

By July 27, 2016

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Pokemon Go has taken over Comic-Con

At San Diego's annual pop culture fest, whose lifeblood is unapologetic obsession, the smartphone game is the fixation of the year.

By July 24, 2016

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Pokemon Go banned in ancient Japanese shrine

Izumo-taisha, one of the oldest Shinto shrines, has banned the game just days after its release in Japan.

By July 25, 2016

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Rest in Pikachu: There's now a Tumblr of people hunting Pokemon at funerals

Alas, poor Uncle Harold, we'll miss you so much, and -- hey, is that a Snorlax over by the casket?

By July 14, 2016

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Pokemon Go: The latest fad diet?

A survey company gives us a quick peek into the minds and lives of Pokemon Go trainers. Turns out they're more active and even losing weight.

By July 15, 2016

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Pokemon goes right to the top of searches on porn sites

Peekaboo Pikachu? The hit mobile game that's driving the world to distraction is prompting some players to look for Pokemon in places you might not have guessed.

By July 12, 2016

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Tom Perkins, founder of pioneering Silicon Valley VC firm, dies at 84

Among his venture capital firm's biggest hits are Google, Amazon, Genentech and Netscape.

By June 9, 2016

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Holograms of Holocaust survivors let crucial stories live on

History preserved: As the aging Holocaust survivor population dwindles, USC scientists scurry to create life-size 3D holograms that can answer viewer questions through Siri-like voice-recognition technology.

By February 11, 2013