250 Results for

high-frequency radio waves

Video

Enhance your beer's flavor with sound waves, Ep. 203

This week on Crave, we use high-frequency sound waves to pour the perfect beer, watch a giant Lego Star Destroyer obliterate itself and check out some of the Internet memes inspired by the big Mayweather-Pacquiao fight. Don't run away. It's the Crave show!

By May 7, 2015

Article

Crave Ep. 203: Enhance your beer's flavor with sound waves

Beer lovers rejoice. Science may have perfected the art of the perfect brew, and it involves digital controllers and sound waves.

By May 7, 2015

Editors' Take

Bose Wave Radio III

Bose Wave Radio III

By May 1, 2012

Article

Deep-space radio waves 'heard' at opposite points on Earth

Anomaly no more? Radio observatories in Australia and Puerto Rico have both now picked up brief bursts of radio waves from beyond our galaxy.

By July 15, 2014

Article

Regulators nix T-Mobile's hopes for more spectrum in upcoming auction

The FCC says it won't vote to increase the spectrum reserved for smaller carriers in the upcoming wireless auction.

By June 25, 2015

Article

T-Mobile wants you to tell Washington what matters on wireless

T-Mobile CEO John Legere aims to rally consumers to his cause as he pressures government regulators to change the rules to favor smaller carriers in wireless auctions.

By June 11, 2015

Article

Meet Fizzics, the gadget that wants to make your beer better

Could science make your beer taste better? A new gadget called Fizzics claims to take your store-bought beer to the next level by delivering the full taste and aroma the brewer intended.

By May 6, 2015

Article

Here's what the Pillars of Creation look like in three dimensions

Data from the Very Large Telescope in Chile suggests that it would be more appropriate to call the Eagle Nebula's famous gas formation the "Pillars of Destruction."

By April 30, 2015

Article

Parkes Observatory: Extraterrestrial messages or microwave noodles?

Strange signals picked up by the radio telescope pointed towards the stars in Parkes, Australia have a rather more mundane origin.

By April 12, 2015

Article

This working computer is smaller than a grain of rice

The University of Michigan's Micro Mote is a fully autonomous computer that's programmed and charged via light and could be used for a variety of medical and industrial purposes.

By April 6, 2015