21 Results for

fmri

Article

Scientists spot 'signature' of physical pain using fMRI

Scientists say that short-term pain in healthy people leaves a distinct neurological trace -- one they were able to catch via fMRI.

By Apr. 11, 2013

Article

'Mind-reading' technology can reconstruct faces from the viewer's brain

Researchers at Yale have developed a method of reconstructing faces locked in the memories of other people.

By Mar. 31, 2014

Article

Dogs may pick up on emotions like you do, science says

Brain scans show that dogs are dying for a beer and secretly wish they were with Scarlett Johansson or Channing Tatum. Or, more precisely, that they react emotionally to sound, in very similar ways to humans.

By Feb. 21, 2014

Article

Faster brain scans offer new perspective on brain activity

Magnetoencephalography allows researchers to observe neural activity with frequency waves that are faster than 50 cycles per second.

By Aug. 7, 2013

Article

Brain scans could one day help diagnose autism earlier

Researchers say MRI scans show very specific brain activity that could help diagnose autism and aid people in determining early treatment options.

By Oct. 17, 2013

Article

Scientists find a way to see your dreams

Japanese scientists have developed an algorithm that's able to predict what dreamers see from their neurological patterns.

By Apr. 8, 2013

Article

Stanford scientists 'eavesdrop' on the human brain

A new method of recording brain activity affords scientists unprecedented monitoring -- and yes, it involves temporarily removing a portion of a patient's skull to insert packets of electrodes.

By Oct. 15, 2013

Article

Regular text messaging could help smokers quit

In two related studies, researchers find that text messaging could be an ideal means of delivering momentary interventions in the lives of smokers trying to quit.

By Mar. 8, 2011

Article

Science secrets of the scariest haunted houses

ScareHouse taps into neuroscience to take the experience from spooky to psychological thriller. Some visitors get so freaked they end up using their safe word.

By Oct. 31, 2013

Article

Your smartphone knows which side of the brain you're using

The iDichotic iPhone app appears to be as reliable as traditional lab tests in determining which side of the brain is most involved in language processing.

By Feb. 8, 2013