24 Results for

fmri

Article

Scientists spot 'signature' of physical pain using fMRI

Scientists say that short-term pain in healthy people leaves a distinct neurological trace -- one they were able to catch via fMRI.

By April 11, 2013

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Groom gives bride a heady gift: His brain

A brain in a jar might not be your idea of a romantic present for the person you're pledging your life to. But you're not a neuroscientist.

By October 2, 2014

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'Mind-reading' technology can reconstruct faces from the viewer's brain

Researchers at Yale have developed a method of reconstructing faces locked in the memories of other people.

By March 31, 2014

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Dogs may pick up on emotions like you do, science says

Brain scans show that dogs are dying for a beer and secretly wish they were with Scarlett Johansson or Channing Tatum. Or, more precisely, that they react emotionally to sound, in very similar ways to humans.

By February 21, 2014

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Supercomputer runs longest simulation of brain activity to date

One of the world's most powerful supercomputers has finally done what had seemed impossible: successfully modelled brain activity.

By January 14, 2014

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Science secrets of the scariest haunted houses

ScareHouse taps into neuroscience to take the experience from spooky to psychological thriller. Some visitors get so freaked they end up using their safe word.

By October 31, 2013

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Brain scans could one day help diagnose autism earlier

Researchers say MRI scans show very specific brain activity that could help diagnose autism and aid people in determining early treatment options.

By October 17, 2013

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Stanford scientists 'eavesdrop' on the human brain

A new method of recording brain activity affords scientists unprecedented monitoring -- and yes, it involves temporarily removing a portion of a patient's skull to insert packets of electrodes.

By October 15, 2013

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Faster brain scans offer new perspective on brain activity

Magnetoencephalography allows researchers to observe neural activity with frequency waves that are faster than 50 cycles per second.

By August 7, 2013

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Robot abuse is a bummer for the human brain

As loveable toy dinosaur Pleo gets both hugged and strangled in the name of science, two studies suggest that we're hardwired to sympathize with them. But how deeply can people feel for robots?

By April 23, 2013