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eshoo

Article

Rep. Eshoo on House's student app competition (podcast)

U.S. Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) discusses a House resolution calling for a student app competition to encourage science, technology, engineering, and math education.

By February 28, 2013

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Rep. Eshoo on truth in 4G advertising (podcast)

Larry Magid speaks with Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) about her bill that would require cellular carriers to disclose minimum data speeds and network reliability on their 4G services.

By June 22, 2011

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Congresswoman wants carriers to come clean on 4G

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-Calif.) introduces bill requiring wireless operators to provide more information about the speed, reliability, and coverage of their 4G service at the point of sale to clear up confusion.

By June 22, 2011

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House bill to protect children online

Rep. Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., says he is introducing a bill that aims to make the Web safer for children by asking congressional Web sites to comply with standards set by Internet content filtering organizations. Among the standards would be those from the Internet Content Ratings Association (ICRA), an international nonprofit group that has developed technology that enables parents to filter Web content by matching individual preferences to self-assigned ratings from Web site operators. The bill encourages Congress members to voluntarily label their sites "in a manner consistent with Internet content labeling and filtering tools, in order to make the Internet safer for children while protecting freedom of expression," according to Goodlatte. The House resolution is co-sponsored by Reps. Anna Eshoo, D-Calif.; Jennifer Dunn, R-Wash.; Bob Etheridge, D-N.C.; Chris Cannon, R-Utah; Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif.; and Adam Smith, D-Wash.

May 23, 2002

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Valley lawmaker wins over Hill Luddites

From backing legislation to protect computer users' privacy to opposing Net content restrictions and supporting tax incentives for high-tech companies, Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-California) has worked on almost every key issue affecting the high-tech industry and Net users during her past seven years on Capitol Hill.

July 20, 1999

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Short Take: Congress gets high-tech advisory group

House Democratic Leader Richard Gephardt has formed the Advisory Group on High-Tech Issues, which will be headed by Silicon Valley Reps. Anna Eshoo and Zoe Lofgren. This advisory group will help keep the high-tech industry's policy agenda on Congress's front burner, including issues such as investing in science and technology as well as ways to further bolster job growth.

June 11, 1999

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Short Take: R&D tax credit may become permanent

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-California) announced key support for legislation to make the Research & Development Tax Credit permanent. Minority Leader Richard Gephardt (D-Montana) and Rep. Charlie Rangel (D-New York), the ranking member in the House Ways & Means Committee, said they will solidify the credit, which is an incentive to create new technologies. Tech companies say the credit is too volatile now because it has to be renewed annually.

March 8, 1999

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Short Take: Clinton endorses House securities litigation bill

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-California) said President Clinton has officially endorsed the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act, her bill to impose "uniform standards" regarding shareholder lawsuits filed in state courts against high-tech companies with volatile stock prices. The Senate Banking Committee is scheduled to mark up the bill.

April 28, 1998

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Short Take: Online breast cancer petition delivered

Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-California) and Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-Connecticut), along with Sapient Health Network, collected 9,226 petition signatures via the Net to support the Breast Cancer Patient Protection Act and Reconstructive Breast Surgery Benefits Act. The petition was delivered to the chairmen of the House committees considering the bills.

March 11, 1998

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CDA amendment introduced

Congresswoman Anna Eshoo (D-California) today introduced an amendment to the Communications Decency Act that would remove the word indecency from the law's language and replace it with the phrase harmful to minors.

March 14, 1996