57 Results for



Homebrewed morphine? It's now possible, say researchers

If you have the right strain of yeast and some sugar, whipping up drugs in your kitchen would be almost as easy as brewing a batch of beer.

By May 19, 2015


Could Viagra make it harder to spread malaria?

The drug that comes in a little blue pill could help keep malaria contained by stiffening up the parasite that causes it, say researchers.

By May 16, 2015


The surprising science of blue jeans

A new video shows how jeans get blue, while new research from UC Berkeley shows how the dye used to get them that way could get greener.

By February 25, 2015


Appliance Science: The uplifting biology of baking

We owe a lot to an invisible organism that makes foods like bread possible. In the latest installment of our Appliance Science column, we look at our favorite fungus: yeast.

By December 16, 2014


The science of drinking all you like and not getting drunk

The co-founder of the Boston Beer Company insists that all you have to do is swallow dry yeast before you start drinking.

By April 26, 2014


Scientists create 'highway of death' for cancer

Instead of relying on drugs to kill tumors, Georgia Tech researchers engineer artificial pathways to lure malignant cells to their death, using a "Pied Piper" approach to treating cancer.

By February 17, 2014


Scientists inch closer to building a drug-delivering nanorobot

Researchers say their proof-of-concept is a major step toward designing a nanocage that carries medicine around the body and targets specific diseased cells.

By December 3, 2013


Anti-hijacker trap door among loony Ig Nobel prizes

Also honored: research into the beer-goggle effect, walking on lunar water, and the probability of cows lying down.

By September 13, 2013


Could a blood test predict suicide risk?

People at risk for suicide don't always show signs of their vulnerability. But a test that can scan biomarkers to predict actual suicidal impulses? While promising, it may go only so far.

By August 21, 2013


How injectable nanogel could help fight diabetes

Nanotechnology could remove the finger prick from the daily routine of people with diabetes with an injectable gel that monitors blood-sugar levels and automatically secretes insulin.

By May 16, 2013