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Crave Ep. 200: Forget maps and let leg electrodes guide you there

Researchers have found a way to get people where they want to go using electrodes attached to the legs. Are humans the future of GPS?

By April 17, 2015


Forget maps and let leg electrodes guide you there, Ep. 200

Crave celebrates its 200th episode with a human cruise control system that's, well, pretty shocking. We check out a bicycle that claims to be the safest in the world, and take a trip to outer space with a doughnut wearing a sprinkles spacesuit. All that, and did we mention that this is the 200th episode of Crave?!

By April 17, 2015


Sennheiser's new €50,000 headphone breaks the 'sound barrier'

The all-new Sennheiser Orpheus electrostatic headphone/amplifier system wows the Audiophiliac.

By November 12, 2015


Quantum-dot sensors poised to leap into your next phone's camera

Samples of InVisage's first QuantumFilm sensor are slated to become available to phone manufacturers by the end of this year.

By November 11, 2015


This is what singing slime mold sounds like

An artist captures the electricity activity of a slime mold and converts it to music. If it starts a band with other slime molds, they better call themselves the Slime Mold Beatles.

By October 8, 2015


Tape-like material sticks to clothes and analyses your insides

Textile and chemistry company Toyobo is developing Cocomi -- a tape-like material that, when attached to clothing, can read signals from your heart and lungs.

By October 6, 2015


Watch five men control a flying balloon shark with their minds

Using a non-invasive brain-control interface, engineer Chip Audette controlled a balloon shark by closing his eyes.

By September 28, 2015


Tongue electrode lets you taste flavor that isn't there

A team at the National University of Singapore has created an electrode device that sits on the tip of your tongue and simulates the tastes of salty, sweet, bitter, and sour.

By November 25, 2013


Paralysed man walks on his own legs, no exoskeleton involved

A man who was paralysed five years ago walked again using a non-invasive brain interface that transfers signals to his own muscles.

By September 24, 2015


Guy shocks his own tongue to learn more about electricity

YouTuber Mehdi Sadaghdar shows how the pain caused by electricity varies according to frequency by hooking some electrodes up to his own tongue. No, seriously.

By August 31, 2015