34 Results for

dragonfly

Article

Robot dragonfly moves like the real thing

German robotics company Festo has created a robot dragonfly that can fly forwards, backwards and sideways, and can even hover in the air.

By April 1, 2013

Article

Indiegogo tries out 'crowdfunding insurance' for failed projects

Indiegogo is rolling out a test of a new service that will refund your money if a project fails to deliver within a certain time frame.

By December 3, 2014

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Want to own a flying robot Dragonfly?

Starting at $99, this tiny UAV is capable of hovering quietly in midair and taking high-definition pictures.

By December 20, 2012

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Fascinating gif visualises the patterns of flight

A beautiful gif deconstructs the wing motions of a bat, a goose, a moth, a dragonfly and a hummingbird to reveal the looping patterns therein.

By September 30, 2014

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Retro spy gear bodes well for future of 'Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.'

Crave's Kelsey Adams gets ready for the new season of "Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D." with a quick salute to the Howling Commandos' EMP joy buzzer and other old-school fun.

By September 23, 2014

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Robotic kangaroo generates its own energy

Festo has once again turned to nature to build a gesture-controlled robotic kangaroo that stores and uses the kinetic energy of its own motion.

By April 6, 2014

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Audioengine's mighty midget digital converter/headphone amplifier does the job

The Audioengine D3 may be teensy, but this affordable component can radically upgrade your computer's sound quality!

By February 5, 2014

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Two gifts under $100 for the audio enthusiast

The Audioquest Dragonfly USB DAC has just been reduced to $99 online; readers can also get a good deal on the Logitech UE Smart Radio.

By December 11, 2013

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Robotic bird takes wing

Professors and students at the University of Maryland have designed a robotic bird that can not only fly, but also perform manoeuvres in the air.

By June 24, 2013

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Robot bees take first flight

Harvard University researchers have conducted the first controlled flight of so-called "RoboBees," which weigh less than a tenth of a gram.

By May 2, 2013