23991 Results for


Editors' Take

Cricket Communications

Cricket Communications provides monthly, no-contract wireless service across the United States.

By March 9, 2008

Please see CNET's Cell phone plan finder to purchase a phone with Cricket Communications.


AT&T accuses Federal Communications Commission of favoritism

The FCC is dragging its feet on granting AT&T a waiver to offer a Wi-Fi calling feature, while letting competitors go ahead, says the company. The feature fails to meet accessibility rules for the disabled.

By October 2, 2015

Editors' Take

GoldKey Secure Communicator

Make calls, answer emails and download apps from the Google Play store without a smartphone.

By January 8, 2015

MSRP: $399.95


The next Android Wear will bring watch-to-watch communication

New features are coming to Android Wear, Google Glass is focusing on Enterprise business for now and the Galaxy Note 5 is coming in August.

By July 14, 2015


Trekkies, rejoice; your smartphone communicator is coming

Bluetooth me up, Scotty. An original series "Star Trek" communicator smartphone handset will make you feel like you're exploring strange new worlds.

By July 7, 2015


LG restructures leadership after smartphone slump

The South Korean company is hoping to breathe new life into its various businesses by giving them more autonomy.

By November 26, 2015


How smartphones offer Syrian refugees a lifeline

Startups and nonprofit organizations are offering high-tech assistance to the hyper-connected wave of Syrian refugees.

By November 27, 2015


How to buy a new phone: The CNET smartphone buying guide

The most important things to know when shopping for a cell phone.

By November 20, 2015


Islamic State militants will aim to kill via cyberattacks, says UK chancellor

The future direction of cybersecurity investment and legislation is a high priority for politicians in the wake of the Paris terror attacks.

By November 17, 2015


On encryption, Clinton tells Silicon Valley to be a team player

Democratic presidential candidate tells tech companies they need to help track down terrorists but stops short of calling for weaker encryption. It's a balancing act between security and privacy.

By November 19, 2015