0 Results for

chertoff

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Real ID will 'strengthen' Americans' privacy, Chertoff says

In another defense of the oft-maligned national-ID requirements, Homeland Security chief claims plan will help combat identity theft.

By September 5, 2007

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After six years, Homeland Security still without 'cybercrisis' plan

The department's cybersecurity division has spent about $400 million, but still has no way to respond to serious cybersecurity crises. Secretary Chertoff voices need for "a plan."

By December 19, 2008

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Rescinding my applause for Chertoff

U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren says the unfilled job of cyberczar--one year after it became vacant--points to a much bigger problem.

July 13, 2006

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Homeland Security secretary proposes 'Manhattan Project'

Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff says Silicon Valley should send "best and brightest" to work with government on preventing cyberattacks.

By April 8, 2008

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Homeland Security: We're ready to launch spy satellite office

Despite privacy concerns from Congress, DHS Secretary Michael Chertoff says plans are underway to let police, border security, and other domestic agencies access detailed satellite imagery.

By April 2, 2008

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Real ID ranks high for U.S. security, spy leaders

An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff offered states a new deadline of February 2008; this deadline had actually been announced earlier.

By September 10, 2007

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DHS chief: Cybersecurity efforts are 'classified'

Michael Chertoff tells politicians that protecting the nation's computer systems is top priority, but he's mum on details, including whether China has ever attempted hacks on his department.

By September 5, 2007

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Homeland Security chief defends Real ID plan

Dismissing privacy concerns, Michael Chertoff says electronically read IDs will make the country more secure.

By December 14, 2006

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Homeland Security chief promises privacy safeguards

Law enforcement will take care not to overstep privacy bounds as intelligence gathering is increased, Michael Chertoff says.

By August 21, 2006