116 Results for

cathode

Article

Bionic eye: 3D printing merges contact lens and QLEDs

Quantum dots have been successfully 3D printed into a contact lens, allowing the lens to project beams of light.

By December 10, 2014

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How to recycle your electronics and gadgets

From TVs to computers, it's important to recycle electronics rather than tossing them in the trash. Here's a handy list of where and how you can get rid of unwanted gadgets.

By December 2, 2014

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First 3D LED printer could print heads-up-display contact lenses

Researchers at Princeton University have developed a 3D printer that can print LEDs in layers -- and it could one day print contact lenses that incorporate heads-up displays.

By November 20, 2014

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This smart battery warns you before catching fire

Stanford University scientists have developed a lithium-ion battery that warns users long before it overheats and explodes.

By October 14, 2014

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Chemistry in Ultra HD shows science like you've never seen it

Discover dancing fluorescent droplets, crystal gardens and watery clouds of chemicals in this new video compilation from BeautifulChemistry.net.

By October 6, 2014

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Light bulb buying guide

The landscape of lighting is changing rapidly. Here's everything you'll need to know to keep up.

By October 2, 2014

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What to expect from IFA, Europe's biggest and most eccentric tech show

Huge launches are expected from Samsung, Sony and others as the German show sets the tech agenda for the rest of the year.

By August 29, 2014

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Monitors buying guide

If you're in the market for a monitor, CNET's buying guide will set you on the right path.

By November 22, 2013

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New battery tech may lead to inexpensive, safer electric cars

Power Japan Plus announced its dual carbon battery technology, which promises longer-lasting and less expensive batteries for electric cars.

By May 13, 2014

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Want to be better at math? Electric shocks could help

In ongoing research with children and adults, an Oxford University researcher finds that stimulating the brain with low-dose electrical currents could help improve learning.

By February 14, 2014