56 Results for

brain-machine interface

Article

Brain-machine interface helps move paralyzed hand

New tech out of Northwestern bypasses the spinal cord to deliver messages directly from the brain to muscles.

By April 19, 2012

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DARPA developing memory-restoring neural prosthesis

An implantable brain chip currently in development could help wounded veterans recover memory function after traumatic brain injuries.

By July 9, 2014

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Indendix EEG lets you type with your brain

Austria's Guger Technologies is billing the device as the world's first commercial personal brain-machine speller.

By March 9, 2010

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Neurobridge device allows quadriplegic to move his own hand

A quadriplegic man has become the first to move his own hand just by using his thoughts, using a new device that bypasses the injured site.

By June 24, 2014

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Paralyzed woman moves robotic arm using thought alone

Using the BrainGate neural interface system, a woman paralyzed by a brainstem stroke serves herself coffee for the first time in 15 years.

By May 17, 2012

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Mind-controlled cursor may be easier than previously thought

University of Washington researchers discover that, when learning to control a cursor with thoughts alone, the brain behaves within mere minutes as if it is performing basic motor skills.

By June 11, 2013

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Berkeley scientists have 'smart dust' on the brain

California researchers theorize that tiny electronic sensors the size of dust particles could be used in future brain studies.

By July 17, 2013

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Monkeys move virtual arms with their minds

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have enabled rhesus monkeys to move a pair of arms in a virtual environment using just their brain activity.

By November 7, 2013

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'RoboCop' not so sci-fi anymore

Nanosuits, powerful prosthetics, and brain-computer interfacing seemed far-fetched when the original movie hit theaters. Now, with a remake nearly three decades later, the plot is closer to reality than you may think.

By February 11, 2014