18 Results for

brain/machine interface

Article

Brain-machine interface helps move paralyzed hand

New tech out of Northwestern bypasses the spinal cord to deliver messages directly from the brain to muscles.

By April 19, 2012

Article

DARPA developing memory-restoring neural prosthesis

An implantable brain chip currently in development could help wounded veterans recover memory function after traumatic brain injuries.

By July 9, 2014

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Neurobridge device allows quadriplegic to move his own hand

A quadriplegic man has become the first to move his own hand just by using his thoughts, using a new device that bypasses the injured site.

By June 24, 2014

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Monkeys move virtual arms with their minds

Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have enabled rhesus monkeys to move a pair of arms in a virtual environment using just their brain activity.

By November 7, 2013

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Berkeley scientists have 'smart dust' on the brain

California researchers theorize that tiny electronic sensors the size of dust particles could be used in future brain studies.

By July 17, 2013

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Mind-controlled cursor may be easier than previously thought

University of Washington researchers discover that, when learning to control a cursor with thoughts alone, the brain behaves within mere minutes as if it is performing basic motor skills.

By June 11, 2013

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Paralyzed man sends first tweet with his eyes

Tony Nicklinson, a paralyzed man with locked-in syndrome, speaks to the world through Twitter with tweets written through eye movements.

By June 18, 2012

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Paralyzed woman moves robotic arm using thought alone

Using the BrainGate neural interface system, a woman paralyzed by a brainstem stroke serves herself coffee for the first time in 15 years.

By May 17, 2012

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Paralyzed woman completes London Marathon in robot suit

A ReWalk robotic exoskeleton allows a paraplegic woman to start and finish the London Marathon, covering the 26.2-mile course over 17 days.

By May 9, 2012

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Bots beat humans probing brain's neural activity

A robotic arm guided by a cell-detecting algorithm could enable scientists to classify thousands of cell types in the brain and learn how diseased ones differ from normal ones.

By May 7, 2012