14 Results for

bluefire

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Bluefire Reader brings free public-library e-books to iOS

It's a little kludgy, but it's also an amazing way to read books like "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo" without spending a dime or driving to the library.

By November 17, 2010

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Sony finally gets Apple approval for iOS Reader app

After a long delay, a free Sony Reader iOS app makes its debut in Apple's App Store.

By November 5, 2012

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BlueFire Ethanol bets on household trash

The dark horse in the cellulosic ethanol race is municipal solid waste, with the first plant set to begin construction within weeks.

By June 5, 2008

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BlueFire: Making ethanol at the landfill

Nobody wants garbage, so why not make ethanol out of it? Company aims to set up series of small ethanol refineries at landfills.

By April 10, 2008

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Bluefire plans a new cell phone security app

The mobile security company introduces its consumer software to Windows Mobile phones in a private beta.

By April 3, 2008

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OverDrive app for iOS: Free e-book downloads

Finally, a way to check out and read free e-books from public libraries, right on your iPhone--no iTunes required. But be prepared: setup's a hassle.

By January 6, 2011

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My five favorite iPhone apps of 2010

In a year packed with great stuff, these five apps stood out--for me, at least. And unlike every other "best of 2010" list you'll see, this one has no Angry Birds.

By December 23, 2010

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'Green' gas and diesel get boost in biofuel grants

Federal government pumps more than $600 million in projects to demonstrate advanced biofuels, including cellulosic ethanol and plant-based replacements for diesel, jet fuel, and gasoline.

By December 4, 2009

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Green news harvest: Obama touts solar, geothermal

Obama marks 100 days after stimulus at huge solar installation at Nellis Air Force base in Nevada, while GE says it will maintain spending on green-tech R&D

By May 27, 2009

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Mississippi to open trash-to-ethanol plant

Canadian company Enerkem to use municipal solid trash and wood chips to make ethanol in a process it says is cleaner than traditional waste-to-energy technologies.

By March 20, 2009