18 Results for

biofeedback

Article

Horror game uses biofeedback to make the experience scarier

Nevermind measures your heart rate to tell when you're getting scared -- then ramps up the horror for a truly boot-shaking experience.

By February 5, 2014

Article

Smart mouse monitors your vitals as you game

The NAOS QG gaming mouse is embedded with biosensors that monitor your physical reactions as you play.

By December 4, 2014

Article

Fund 3D horror film, get rare 'Texas Chainsaw Massacre' rewards

Crowdfund fear with an indie horror film that wants to scare you in more than one dimension. Backers of the film are offered "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" collectibles from the co-creator himself.

By October 22, 2014

Article

How Siri is this? A yoga mat that talks to you

You've always wanted an artificially intelligent yoga mat, haven't you? Here's SmartMat, a yoga mat with a nice Siri-like yoga teacher whispering "downward dogs" to you.

By September 30, 2014

Article

Biofeedback video game teaches kids anger management

Doctors at Boston Children's Hospital have been using a video game that monitors children's heart rates to help them keep their tempers in check.

By October 28, 2012

Article

Biofeedback video game helps kids control anger

In RAGE Control, users with elevated heart rates lose the ability to shoot enemy spaceships and must calm down to get their game back on.

By October 25, 2012

Article

Rob Zombie asks horror fans to fund killer-clown movie

The gore-loving rocker is making a movie about murderous clowns, and you can get involved if you've got enough cash.

By August 1, 2014

Article

Beyond step-counting: The future of wearables

Makers of wearables are looking for new things to track about your body, even if they need to poke inside it.

By May 11, 2014

Article

Lumafit: Fitness tracker and heart-rate monitor for your ear

Tired of wrists? Lumafit measures heart rate and body motion by attaching to the ear instead.

By April 29, 2014

Article

Wearable smart glass curates content based on your physical response

A wearable eyepiece measures physiological responses such as pupil dilation and heartbeat to find content on the web that will interest you.

By April 15, 2014