20 Results for

autostereoscopic

Article

DIY autostereoscopic 3D for just $5

All you need for this weekend project are transparency film, a regular 1,200dpi printer, and a monitor that's 24 inches or smaller.

By January 25, 2011

Article

Post-4K OLED TV: Where does picture quality go from here?

Now that there are 4K OLED televisions, can picture quality get any better? Have we achieved perfection? If so, where do we go from here? Here's a list of next steps.

By October 7, 2014

Article

Apple envisions way to control 3D objects using 3D gestures

A newly published patent application describes how to manipulate touch-screen objects in three dimensions through gestures.

By August 20, 2013

Article

Active 3D vs. passive 3D: What's better?

Curious about the difference between active 3D and passive 3D? So is CNET reader Taher. Geoff Morrison helps him out.

By June 4, 2012

Article

Is the glasses-free 3D laptop ready for prime time?

Thanks to updated Nvidia drivers, 3D games now work on the autostereoscopic Toshiba Qosmio F755.

By May 4, 2012

Article

Why 4K TVs are stupid

There's all this buzz about 4K resolution. You don't need it, and probably never will.

By January 26, 2012

Article

Sony takes another stab at glasses-free 3D TV

The company's concept 3D TVs at CES 2012 ditch the glasses, but are they just an evolution of a gimmick?

By January 11, 2012

Article

Hands-on with Toshiba's Qosmio F755 glasses-free 3D laptop, hitting US stores this month

First spotted as a CES prototype, the autostereoscopic Qosmio F755 hits stores August 16, at a price of $1,699.

By August 2, 2011

Article

Nokia 3D phone in development, new patent hints

Nokia has filed a patent suggesting it may be ready to build a 3D-capable mobile device. The gadget is reminiscent of the Nintendo 3DS, but with a novel eye-tracking system.

By May 10, 2011

Article

iPont shows no-glasses 3D conversion tech

Autostereoscopic display technology is gradually maturing. Hungarian company iPont is showing its technology on a Tridelity display that requires no glasses.

By January 6, 2011