99 Results for

aiff

Article

Sony's tiny high-resolution audio player might be the next big thing

It's called the Walkman NWZ-A17, and this wafer-thin player has a lot going for it, says the Audiophiliac.

By October 11, 2014

Article

This ultimate portable music player will make your ears jump for joy

The HiFiMan HM-901 is a game changer: it's easily the best-sounding portable music player on the planet.

By July 19, 2014

Article

Sony launches high-res audio range

Sony has released a range of its high-end audio products in Australia, from headphones to speakers, all designed for listening to high-res audio files.

By March 24, 2014

Article

Sony gets serious about high-resolution audio, again

Sony unveils a new line of high-resolution players, but the Audiophiliac wonders if this is just a replay of the SACD saga.

By September 6, 2013

Article

Change your Notification Center sound

A quick custom sound replacement in your user library can adjust the default sound used in Notification Center.

By April 1, 2013

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How to tame annoying alert sounds in OS X

OS X supports a few custom handling options for alert sounds to make them less intrusive.

By December 20, 2012

Article

iTunes Match vs. Amazon Cloud Player: What's the better option?

CNET's Donald Bell compares Apple's iTunes Match cloud music service to Amazon's Cloud Player, recently updated with scan and match song identification and a paid tier with a 250,000-song limit.

By August 2, 2012

Article

Can an MP3 sound better than a Blu-ray?

High-resolution formats define the upper limit of quality, but if the recording's mix was overcompressed and processed, a lossless file won't sound great.

By January 28, 2012

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Confused about iTunes Match? Apple tries a new explanation

Apple has launched a new Web page with a step-by-step description of its cloud-based music service, complete with video and FAQ.

By December 28, 2011

Article

Five free voice-recording iPad apps compared

Two let you e-mail short voice messages and upload the sound files to Dropbox, Wi-Fi or ftp servers. One coverts speech to text ready to be e-mailed or pasted. But two fall short.

By December 29, 2011