6 Results for

Web-enabled device

Article

How to stream your music collection to any Web-enabled device

If you've got a sizable music collection at home or at work, the odds are that you've wanted access to it elsewhere. Syncing MP3 players can be a hassle, and few can handle the storage requirements for a big library. Audiogalaxy is a free service that can stream your music from your library to any Web-enabled device. Here's how to use it.

By June 2, 2011

Article

Share and access Android files from any location with Shynk

It's not hard to get files on and off your Android device if you're on the same network as your target. Shynk expands on this, making it possible to share files with any Web-enabled device over the Internet.

By June 22, 2012

Article

How to stream your music from the cloud for free

Cloud storage is becoming increasingly popular, with a wide array of space, sharing, and cost options. For those who want a virtual MP3 player, ease of use and low cost are important, and MiMedia offers 7GB of free storage and a simple interface that lets users stream their music using any Web-enabled device. Learn how to use it in this blog post by Rob Lightner.

By May 25, 2011

Article

Turning cheap cell phones into smarter phones

A company called iSkoot says it can turn an inexpensive feature-phone into a Web-enabled device for checking Facebook updates and Twittering friends.

By March 11, 2009

Article

ViAir drums up $15.3 million

ViAir has raised a $15.3 million second round of funding, bringing the total capital raised to $23.3 million. Spectrum Equity Investors led the round, which included investments from 3i, Mercury Interactive and previous investor The Barksdale Group. Seattle-based ViAir has developed technology to allow employees to access their corporate e-mail, calendar and contacts using any Web-enabled device. See complete list.

By May 22, 2001

Article

Xythos Software grabs $6.3 million

Xythos Software received a $6.3 million first round of funding from IDG Ventures, Softbank Venture Capital and other investors. The San Francisco-based company has developed software that allows customers to access secure files from any Web-enabled device and allows them to write and share information. The company plans to use the funds to increase research and development, along with accelerating the debut of its WebFile software. See complete list.

By May 1, 2001