48 Results for

J. Allard

Article

Microsoft shakes up entertainment unit; Bach out

In a reorganization, division chief Robbie Bach and CTO J. Allard are both leaving, with Microsoft splitting the entertainment and devices business into parts.

By May 25, 2010

Article

Making sense of Microsoft's reorg

Although Redmond frequently shuffles its executive ranks, Tuesday's departure of Robbie Bach and J. Allard is a big deal. CNET's Ina Fried takes a look at the implications and fallout.

By May 25, 2010

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Zune-Xbox rumors map to Microsoft organization

What's J Allard been doing? The company isn't talking, but it's easy to believe that Microsoft's going to release some sort of combination Xbox-Zune device.

By May 15, 2009

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Courier tablet one of many Microsoft prototypes

The dual-screen prototype is indeed legit, but is just one of many prototypes cooked up as part of a skunkworks project being headed by J. Allard, sources tell CNET News' Ina Fried.

By September 22, 2009

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Xbox 360 to be under AU$400?

Microsoft's J Allard tells TheStreet.com that Microsoft's next-gen console "will be in the neighbourhood" of US$299 (AU$395.74).

By May 30, 2005

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How Windows 8 KO'd the innovative Courier tablet

There was plenty of innovation in Microsoft's ill-fated Courier tablet. The project ultimately died when Microsoft decided to bet solely on Windows for tablet computing.

By November 2, 2011

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If nothing else, Microsoft's keeping business consultants busy

So Steve Ballmer announces a reorganization to bring more focus to Microsoft. It's almost an annual event.

By July 11, 2013

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Former Microsoft Courier team members launch iPad apps

Former execs associated with the nixed Courier dual-screen tablet project are resurfacing at companies doing Courier-inspired apps for Apple's tablet.

By March 29, 2012

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Report: Microsoft to restructure consumer unit

A shake-up is looming for Redmond's consumer gadgets division, as the company faces tougher competition from Apple and Google, according to The Wall Street Journal.

By May 24, 2010