213 Results for

GelSight

Article

MIT GelSight is portable, high-res 3D imaging tech

MIT scientists have improved GelSight, their portable imaging device that can provide 3D images for everything from product testing to forensics.

By August 9, 2011

Editors' Take

BloomSky

Billed as a super-personal yet networked weather station, the BloomSky promises to see as well as measure the elements.

July 16, 2014

MSRP: $169.00

Video

Samsung Galaxy Tab S: Premium Android tablet line has Apple's iPads in its sights

Equipped with a new AMOLED display and svelte design, the Galaxy S Tab, which comes in 8.4-inch and 10.5-inch versions, is Samsung's latest answer to the iPad.

By June 12, 2014

Article

PayPal sets sights on China, beyond with new biz tools

The payments company wants merchants to capitalize on overseas shopping trends like China's "Singles' Day," the biggest e-commerce holiday of the year.

By June 12, 2014

Article

Bigger sights and clearer sounds for the elderly

A little bit of tech can help those who are losing their sight or hearing. Before things like hearing aids are required, check out projectors, wireless headphones, and more.

By May 7, 2014

Editors' Take

Cree T8 LED

With high marks in efficiency and light quality, this tubular LED is an attempt to change commercial lighting.

May 5, 2014

MSRP: $30.00

Gallery

Neato's Botvac 85 sets its sights on clean (pictures)

A few updates and a new feature help distinguish the Botvac 85 from Neato's existing XV line.

12 Images By April 23, 2014

Article

Wave your hand to control smart devices -- even if it's out of sight

The new "AllSee" gesture-recognition device lets you manipulate TV signals in the air using wizard-like hand movements to control your tech.

By February 28, 2014

Article

One year on, Tizen has its sights set on smartwatches and cars

A year after Samsung first showed Tizen on a phone, CNET looks at where the open-source OS stands now and where it's headed next.

By February 25, 2014

Article

Lumus smartglasses to get EyeSight gesture recognition

The Israeli gesture-control company believes that hand and finger motions are a more versatile way to control wearable computers, and Lumus agreed.

By February 24, 2014