226 Results for

ATOMS

Article

Smash Lego atoms with a Large Hadron Collider model

A physicist is gathering supporters for an ATLAS experiment Lego mini model that could put a piece of the Large Hadron Collider in the hands of Lego fans everywhere.

By Jun. 18, 2013

Article

Thom Yorke, Atoms for Peace leave music-streaming services

Yorke, the frontman for Atoms for Peace, has removed the band's albums from Spotify, Rdio, and Deezer.

By Jul. 15, 2013

Gallery

Atoms as bits? IBM is getting close (images)

Researchers from Big Blue say they have been able to store a bit of information with just 12 magnetic atoms. Today's disk drives require a minimum of a million atoms to do the same job.

6 Images By Jan. 12, 2012

Article

IBM breakthrough could measure rapid changes to atoms

This story initially gave an incorrect figure for the increase in monitoring speed. Scientists believe they will now be able to record atoms' behavior at speeds of up to a million times faster than was previously thought possible.

By Sep. 23, 2010

Article

IBM breakthrough could measure rapid changes to atoms

Scientists at IBM Research say they have pioneered a way to measure environmental effects on individual atoms much more quickly than was previously possible.

By Sep. 23, 2010

Gallery

Spectacular views as ionized atoms bombard Earth (photos)

A set of photos from particularly dramatic displays of the aurora borealis visible to millions in the last few days due to what NASA calls a coronal mass ejection.

14 Images By Aug. 6, 2010

Article

IBM's 35 atoms and the rise of nanotech

Don Eigler moved a single atom two decades ago. Since then, he and IBM have taken new steps in pursuing a dream of compact, power-efficient computing.

By Sep. 28, 2009

Article

Can data be stored on single atoms?

This article originally had an incorrect figure for the number of bits of data that might fit on an iPod. The correct number is 1,000 trillion.

By Aug. 31, 2007

Article

Can data be stored on single atoms?

Anisotropy--there's a word you don't hear everyday. It's the focus of IBM research published this week that could result in incredibly tiny computers.

By Aug. 30, 2007

Article

We can 'see' atoms now: Nanoscanning microscopic images

Heretofore unseeable smallness is now visible due to recent microscope innovations.

By Feb. 15, 2008