Mio C710 review:

Mio C710

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Starting at $750
  • Receiver 20 channel
  • Recommended Use automotive
  • Weight 6 oz
  • Voice navigation instructions, warnings
  • Antenna built-in
  • Features anti-glare, transmissive
  • Maps Included Canada, USA
  • Run Time (Up To) 5 sec

Roadshow Editors' Rating

7.0 Overall

The Good The ultraportable Mio C710 can navigate, give you traffic updates, connect to a Bluetooth phone for hands-free calls, and play music and video. Its accurate receiver did a good job of tracking our location.

The Bad The Mio C710 lacks text-to-speech functionality and its list of compatible Bluetooth phones is limited. Also, the C710's screen was barely readable in sunlight and the device was sometimes sluggish when switching between apps.

The Bottom Line The Mio C710 offers solid navigation and entertainment features in one sleek package, but its Bluetooth capabilities and screen need some work.

A lot of GPS manufacturers today are integrating multimedia features into their devices to make these portable navigation systems more versatile in the car and on foot. And while we appreciate the inclusion of such things as MP3 playback and picture viewing, we've always felt these additions were more of an afterthought or that the device's form factor didn't lend itself for true portability. However, this isn't the case with the Mio C710 ($649.95). It's ultracompact to make it a travel-friendly gadget, and the multimedia features are well integrated into the device. The C710 proved to be a reliable navigator, and it includes traffic services and built-in Bluetooth for hands-free calling. However, it has some setbacks. First, the list of compatible Bluetooth phones is quite limited, making the feature useless to most people, and the screen is hard to read in sunlight. Still, with its solid performance and attractive form factor, the Mio C710 is a handy and versatile device to use in and out of the car. The Mio C710 sports an ultracompact form factor. At just 4.4 by 3.0 by 0.7 inches and 6 ounces, you won't have any problems transporting this device from car to car or on foot. You also get a nice carrying case with a carabiner attached if you want to latch it onto your bag. Alternatively, you can easily slip this into your bag or purse, although you'll want some sort of case to protect the screen from scratches. Mio says the C710 was designed for the fashion-conscious traveler, and we certainly found the gadget to be attractive, with its sleek all-black casing and minimalist design.

Just four rubberized buttons are on the right spine: power on/off, main menu, volume up, and volume down. You can access the rest of the C710's functions via the 3.5-inch, 65,000-color display. The touch screen is responsive, and text and images are clear and sharp. In addition, the menu icons are large and easy to understand. But it's not a complete lovefest, as we had a couple of complaints. First, the C710 is barely readable in sunlight. We had a really hard time viewing maps as we drove around on a sunny day in San Francisco, even after we adjusted the angle of the device. Viewing videos and pictures outdoors in a park was also abysmal. Our second gripe was that the virtual keyboard was on the cramped side. We had to pay particular attention as were inputting addresses; still, we had numerous mistakes. Users with larger digits will definitely want to test this feature out before committing to the purchase.


The Mio C710 keeps it simple, with just four external controls.

There's an SD/MMC card expansion slot on the top of the Mio C710 for carrying extra media, such as music and video. On the bottom of the device, you'll find a mini USB port, a reset hole, and a 3.5mm headphone jack (accepts Walkman-style headphones) that also doubles as the traffic antenna jack. There are two small LEDs to the upper left of the screen; the first illuminates orange while the battery charges and the bottom one blinks blue when Bluetooth is ready for use. Finally, the speaker is located on the back along with a port for attaching an external antenna for better satellite reception.

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