Write: Tablet Notepad/Journal review: Write: Tablet Notepad/Journal

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CNET Editors' Rating

4.5 stars Outstanding
  • Overall: 8.8
  • Installation and Setup: 10.0
  • Features and Support: 8.0
  • Interface: 9.0
  • Performance: 9.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Sleek, minimalist design and a variety of fonts make it easy to get in the zone while you're writing with Write.

The Bad The $2.99 price seems a bit steep for such a simple app. Also, it needs an archive or trash folder and compatibility with phones.

The Bottom Line If you're looking for power features, Write doesn't have them. Otherwise, it's a perfect app for tablet owners who want to get focused on their writing.

Don't Miss

For a minimalist, no-nonsense text editor for your tablet, look no further than Write. Great for students, Write offers only a simple blank screen (choose from black or white background) and a blinking cursor, which helps minimize distractions so you can focus on finishing that big paper that's due in a few hours. Just fire it up on your tablet, hook up a Bluetooth keyboard or other input device, and get in the zone.

When you first launch Write, you'll see a Guide document giving you the rundown on how to use the app. If you'd like, you can open it up and read it, but I would suggest jumping right in and playing around with its text instead. It should be pretty easy to figure out. Before starting your own doc, choose a theme via the menu in the top-right corner of the Home screen. The Night theme gives you white text on black background; the Day theme offers the opposite scheme. Once you're done, hit New, either on the left-hand column or on the top-right of the Home screen to get started.

Don't Miss

 

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Where to Buy

Write: Tablet Notepad/Journal

Part Number: uk.amimetic.journal.honeycomb

$2.99

Quick Specifications See All

  • Category Office and productivity
  • Compatibility Android
About The Author

Jaymar Cabebe covers mobile apps and Windows software for CNET. While he may be a former host of the Android Atlas Weekly podcast, he doesn't hate iOS or Mac. Jaymar has worked in online media since 2007.