Wii MotionPlus review: Wii MotionPlus

We couldn't tell the difference between actual swinging, however. It seemed the Wii remote was just as accurate in detecting our pullback regardless of whether or not MotionPlus was attached.

During our testing with Grand Slam Tennis, the MotionPlus control was even less impressive. Sure, our player's racket was moving perfectly with our Wii remote before a serve, but that control didn't translate well during actual gameplay. In fact, we found that MotionPlus made the game even harder to play. When we took off the device, we had a much easier time keeping the ball in play.

When it was time to try out Wii Sports Resort, we instantly realized what Nintendo had in mind for the new technology. For example, the opening scene of the game lets you control your skydiving Mii character with the Wii remote. We turned and twisted the remote, with our Mii mimicking our movements onscreen.

Table Tennis is surprisingly accurate--the game interprets top and back spin impressively and even allows you to fade the ball. Archery is another sport where MotionPlus shines; you'll be awed by the realistic feeling of pulling back on the bow.

It's perhaps the Frisbee game that displays MotionPlus' true potential. You'll have fun watching your Mii character with the 1:1 replication before you toss the disc. While it does take some getting used to, the simulation does a very accurate job of allowing you to aim and toss a Frisbee into a bull's-eyed area.

Not everything in Sports Resort shows off the capabilities of MotionPlus. The rehashed bowling game appears to have nothing more than a cosmetic overhaul.

As we touched on earlier, it is difficult to give Wii MotionPlus a buy/do-not-buy recommendation. While you may not love the way it feels in your hand, you'll be forced to use it if you want to play games like Wii Sports Resort and the upcoming Ubisoft sequel Red Steel 2.

At the end of the day, the value and innovation MotionPlus can potentially provide will lie in the hands of the developers who program for it. It appears the technology will open up a wide range of uses, so we'll just have to see how it is eventually applied.

Priced at $20, you'll most likely only feel the monetary burden should you choose to purchase additional units, since games like Wii Sports Resort come with the accessory bundled inside. However there is no denying, it does tack some cash onto the cost of owning a Wii, the console that is generally regarded as the most affordable to own.

Sure we'd like to see MotionPlus built-in to a new Wii remote, but Nintendo has yet to mention anything like that is in development.

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Wii MotionPlus

Part Number: rvlagl1 Released: Jun 5, 2009
Low Price: $28.94 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date Jun 5, 2009
  • CE Product Type game controller motion adapter