Tupsu for Android review: An attractive, addicting, and free puzzler

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

CNET Editors' Rating

4 stars Excellent
  • Overall: 8.5
  • Installation and Setup: 10.0
  • Features and Support: 8.0
  • Interface: 8.0
  • Performance: 10.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Tupsu is a unique puzzler with attractive graphics and addictive game play.

The Bad Because Tupsu's eyeball is so tiny, it can be difficult to grab, and therefore difficult to control. No pinch-to-zoom in Camera view mode.

The Bottom Line Tupsu is a free downoad with realistic physics, attractive animation, and addicting gameplay. If you're into puzzlers, it's worth a download.

Don't Miss

Compared with other physics puzzlers I've played, Tupsu has a unique look and feel. Its levels are mostly on the darker side, and its eerie music creates a Tim-Burton-in-outer-space sort of vibe. The animation is clean, the detailing on the background and objects is sharp, and the physics just feel right. Altogether, these elements create a visually attractive playing environment that feels more like an actual world than other physics-based games like Cut the Rope.

The idea of the game is simple: get the furry little Tupsu monster to the black hole at the end of each level and collect as many stars as you can along the way. There can be any number of stars on each level, the more you get, the more points you score. The challenge, of course, lies in Tupsu's unique anatomy. See, Tupsu doesn't exactly cover ground the way other monsters might because Tupsu doesn't have any limbs. He does, however, have elastic eyeballs that can be used like rubbery grappling hooks to stick to surfaces and pull himself around. It may sound like it doesn't make any sense, but believe me, it does when you get behind the wheel and play.

Don't Miss

 

ARTICLE DISCUSSION

Conversation powered by Livefyre

Where to Buy

Tupsu (Android)

Part Number: gabumba.tupsu.android

Free

Quick Specifications See All

  • Category Games
  • Compatibility Android
About The Author

Jaymar Cabebe covers mobile apps and Windows software for CNET. While he may be a former host of the Android Atlas Weekly podcast, he doesn't hate iOS or Mac. Jaymar has worked in online media since 2007.