TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless-N Nano Router review: TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless-N Nano Router

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.3
  • Design and ease of use: 6.0
  • Features: 9.0
  • Performance: 7.0
  • Service and support: 7.0

Average User Rating

0.5 stars 1 user review
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router (TL-WR702N) is really small, affordable, and flexible, and provides good performance.

The Bad The TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router doesn't work as a router out of the box, which potentially could make it hard to access its Web interface. The router, for now, doesn't support IPv6.

The Bottom Line Tiny and affordable, the TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router makes a great companion for mobile users needing to share their hotel room's Internet with wireless clients.

Editors' Top Picks

You should really watch out for a choking hazard with the TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router, model TL-WR702N. This may well be the tiniest Wireless-N router you can find.

Despite its tiny size, the Nano router offers more wireless functions than many regular-size routers. It can be used as a router, an access point, a range extender, or a media bridge. Its best, and default, use is as an access point for those wanting to quickly add wireless clients to an existing wired network, such as that of a hotel room. That plus the ultracompact size makes the router a useful companion for mobile users.

That said, the Nano Router is obviously far from perfect and lacks many things you can find in a full-size router. Considering its current street price of just $21, however, you won't go wrong with it.

Design and features
Measuring 2.2 inches by 0.7 inch by 2.2 inches and weighing just 8 ounces, the square TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router is about the size of a candy bar. And it looks like one, too, with a sleek two-tone plastic cover that comes in white and a mild blue. On one side, the router has an Ethernet port and a standard Micro-USB 2.0 port for charging. The included USB charger, which is relatively compact in its own right, is in fact bulkier than the router itself. The router also comes with a flat network cable neatly curled, ready to be carried when you're on the go.

The router's Ethernet port works either as a LAN port (to connect to a client) or a WAN port (to connect to an Internet source). The only time it works as a WAN port is when the TL-WR702N is being used as a router. When it's used as an access point, range extender, or media bridge, this port acts as a LAN port.

The TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router offers many functions that you can change using its Web interface, which unfortunately might be hard to access at first.
The TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless N Nano Router offers many functions that you can change using its Web interface, which unfortunately might be hard to access at first. Dong Ngo

Along these lines, the Nano would be a much better-designed product if it came with a hardware switch, allowing users to quickly change its function. Instead, you have to resort to its Web interface for this. And getting to the router's Web interface will probably be tricky for novice users. More on this below.

However, if you just want to use the Nano in its default function of an access point, setting it up is simple. On the bottom of the device, there's a small label that shows the default wireless work name (or the SSID) and the default password. This information varies from one unit to another and is all you need to use it. Plug the Nano into power, connect its Ethernet port to an existing wired network, such as a switch or a router, and you're ready. All you need to do now is connect wireless clients to its wireless network with the provided information.

Editors' Top Picks

 

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Where to Buy See All

TP-Link 150Mbps Wireless-N Nano Router

Part Number: TL-WR702N
Low Price: $17.75 See all prices

Quick Specifications See All

  • Data Transfer Rate 150 Mbps
  • Connectivity Technology wireless
About The Author

CNET editor Dong Ngo has been involved with technology since 2000, starting with testing gadgets and writing code for CNET Labs' benchmarks. He now manages CNET San Francisco Labs, reviews networking and storage products, and also writes about other topics from online security to new gadgets and how technology impacts the life of people around the world.