Sony DVDirect VRD-MC3 review: Sony DVDirect VRD-MC3

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.5
  • Design: 8.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 8.0
  • Service and support: 6.0
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good Makes transferring video footage a breeze; lots of connection options; built-in media card reader; can connect directly to PictBridge printer for photo printing; built-in display lets you preview discs; menus are straightforward and functional.

The Bad Requires a Sony camcorder to take full advantage of features; can't edit videos; works with limited number of photo file formats; can't rearrange photo order prior to burning a slide show.

The Bottom Line Although it's pricey, the Sony DVDirect VRD-MC3 is a boon for anyone who has lots of old videotapes but less time or tech skills to digitize them using a computer. Even better, it doubles as an external DVD burner, so you can use it with your PC long after you've transferred all those old tapes.

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Sony DVDirect VRD-MC3

The Sony DVDirect VRD-MC3 takes the pain out of transferring video and photos from your camcorder, VCR, or media cards onto DVDs that are playable on a PC or DVD player. At $250, it's far more expensive than a run-of-the-mill DVD burner, but it also offers more features. And for anyone who has piles of old VHS tapes, it may be well worth the expense, as the Sony DVDirect makes digitizing the video child's play. It also functions as a standard external DVD burner for use with your PC. Be forewarned, though, that unless you have a relatively new Sony camcorder, your options are somewhat limited. We really like this multifeatured burner and appreciate the ease with which we were able to complete several projects. If you intend to edit your videos before burning, though, the Sony DVDirect isn't the right choice for you; you're better off using your PC to accomplish your tasks.

Design
The Sony DVDirect is bulky, even for an external burner, though that's not surprising given the drive's many features and connection options. The left edge is covered with connectors, including a USB port for connecting to a PC or PictBridge printer; a USB port for connecting a recent Sony Handycam; a DV-in port for MiniDV or Digital 8mm camcorders; and S-Video ports, Composite Video, and standard RCA audio inputs for analog camcorders (or other video electronics). The right edge houses three media card slots that accept Memory Stick, Memory Stick Duo, SD, xD-Picture, and CompactFlash cards. The disc tray slides out from the front edge, and the top face houses the menu navigation units, Record and Pause buttons, and a 3-inch color display window on which you can peruse the menu or preview videos and images (the VRD-MC1--the predecessor to this model--had a 2.5-inch display). Our only design quibble is that we wish the display window was hinged so that we could prop it up for improved visibility. Even sitting next to it, we had to crane to read the menu. Having said that, the menu is clear and easy to decipher, as all the options are laid out in plain English.

Features
You can do a ton of tasks with the Sony DVDirect--if you have the right equipment. Some of the drive's many features require you to have a Sony camcorder in order to use them. Still, even without a Sony camera, you have a compelling set of options. The most obvious use of the VRD-MC3 is the ability to transfer video directly from camcorder to DVD. There are five methods of doing so: DVD burn, full recording, incremental recording, consolidation recording, and normal video recording. The included manual clearly delineates which tasks require which types of cameras and connectors.

DVD burn is the easiest, since it is essentially a one-button operation, but it only works with Sony hard drive-based camcorders. You connect the camcorder via USB and press the DVD Burn button on the camcorder. Once you do this, the recording process is the same as incremental mode, which means that if your content doesn't fill the disc, you can choose not to finalize the DVD. (Finalizing allows you to play back the disc on PCs or DVD players, but you can't record additional content to the disc.) As you record more video, you can continue to connect it and add only the new video to the DVD until the disc is full. If you have more content than will fit onto the disc you're using, the DVDirect will finalize the first disc before instructing you to insert a second blank disc. The recording stops automatically when the content runs out.

Full record mode allows you to copy all the contents from an HDD camcorder, a DVD camcorder, or a DV camcorder onto a DVD; the disc will be finalized automatically. Consolidation recording is an option only for Sony DVD camcorders: you can consolidate the contents of several mini DVDs onto a single DVD. Finally, normal video recording is a real-time transfer of video content from non-Sony camcorders, including HDD, DV, and DVD camcorders from other manufacturers, a VCR, or a DVR--basically any device with a video output connector. Normal video recording is a manual operation--press Play on the output device and record on DVDirect (not unlike dubbing tapes in the '80s). Once you've created a video DVD, you can preview it in the display window. Only discs created with the Sony DVDirect drive can be previewed, and you won't hear the audio portion.

The built-in media card reader also lets you transfer photos to DVD. (If you have an HDD camcorder, you can also create a photo DVD of stills stored on the camcorder's hard drive.) You can choose to transfer all the photos on a card, or pick and choose individual photos. Once you do this, you have two options: create a backup photo DVD or a slide show photo DVD. Both require JPEG files. When creating a slide show DVD, you can even add music and playback the slide show on a PC or a standalone DVD player, though the music options are limited to three preinstalled instrumental tunes. Once you've created a photo DVD, you can connect the Sony DVDirect drive to a PictBridge-enabled photo printer for direct printing (you can also do this using the built-in media card reader). Note: you can only print photos off a DVD if it was created using the DVDirect drive. If you find that you don't need the built-in media card reader, consider the VRD-VC30: it's basically the same drive, but without the card readers, for about $200.

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