Sony Dash review: Sony Dash

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CNET Editors' Rating

3.5 stars Very good
  • Overall: 7.3
  • Design: 7.0
  • Features: 8.0
  • Performance: 7.0

Average User Rating

2.5 stars 2 user reviews
Review Date:
Updated on:

The Good The Sony Dash delivers a personalized buffet of news, music, and video from across the Web, packed into a 7-inch touch-screen display.

The Bad For all its features, nothing about the Dash really stands out as a pillar function. The built-in speakers are wimpy. You can't run it using batteries. Touch-screen sensitivity is sluggish.

The Bottom Line The Sony Dash is a fun device for tech enthusiasts looking to cram the Web into every corner of their homes, but it's not a fit for everyone.

Editors' Top Picks

As an evolution of one of CNET's favorite technological misfits, the Chumby , the Sony Dash offers a range of online news and media, boiled down to a small, simple, touch-screen device. We can't say it's the most practical piece of tech you'll own, but at $199, it packs just enough features to justify a place in any tech addicted home.

Design
Powered off, the wedge-shaped design of the Dash looks more like a glorified doorstop than a Personal Internet Viewer (as Sony titles it). Plug in the included power adapter, and you'll realize that the Dash's unassuming design is only there to set the stage for the real star of the show: the screen.

The color LCD on the Dash measures 7 inches diagonally, and offers a bright and crisp view of default information, such as the local weather and time. The screen also responds to touch, allowing you to pull up menus and juggle between different media.

On the top of the Dash you'll see 2.5-inch-wide Menu button that also acts as a snooze for the built-in alarm clock. To its right, an inch-wide volume rocker allows fine control over audio. The back of the Dash is bare; the bottom houses a recessed power adapter input. Battery power is not an option.

A hinged door on the side of the Dash gives access to a 3.5mm headphone output, as well as a standard USB port. In theory, users can load music, videos, or photos by connecting a thumb drive to the USB port, but the firmware on the unit we tested didn't allow it (it's coming soon, apparently).

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Release date May. 10, 2010
  • Wireless Connectivity IEEE 802.11g
About The Author

Donald Bell has spent more than five years as a CNET senior editor, reviewing everything from MP3 players to the first three generations of the Apple iPad. He currently devotes his time to producing How To content for CNET, as well as weekly episodes of CNET's Top 5 video series.