Securifi Almond review: Securifi Almond

There are a few other oddities like that here and there in the interface but what baffled me the most is the fact that the Web interface offers the option to make the router work in either the 5GHz or 2.4GHz band, as if it were a selectable dual-band router. In fact, the router is just a single-band router that works only in the 2.4GHz band.

Also, while the Almond offers the type of advanced features commonly found in most routers, it doesn't seem to support IPv6. Hopefully this will be added via a firmware update since IPv6, which is to replace the existing IPv4 that's running out of addressing space, is being officially used by many Web sites .

As mentioned above, setting up the Almond is easy thanks to its LCD. But if that seems difficult, the router comes configured with a main Wi-Fi network and a Guest Wi-Fi network, the settings of which you can see by tapping on the Wireless tile button of the touch screen. And that's all you need to get connected. The router supports a maximum of 50 Wi-Fi clients.

Performance
Considering the Almond's small size, I didn't expect much from the router in terms of performance and it indeed didn't impress. It wasn't bad either, scoring about 50Mbps in the close-range (15 feet) throughput test. When I increased the distance to 100 feet it now registered only about 17Mbps.

And 100 feet is about as far as you want to use the router. In my testing at CNET HQ, where there are many other Wi-Fi devices that might interfere with my tests, the router's range was just about 150 feet.

The Almond passed the 24-hour stress test, during which it didn't disconnect once.

The Almond worked well as an extender but since its range is rather limited, it didn't offer much extended range in my trials. Also since it doesn't support the 5GHz band, clients connected to its extended-range network should expect much slower data rates and more lag, than when connected to the original network.

CNET Labs 2.4GHz Wireless-N performance test (in Mbps)
(Longer bars indicate better performance)
Range  
Throughput  
Cisco Linksys E2000
51.3 
74.2 
Cisco RV110W
28.4 
62.6 
Cisco Linksys E1500
37.4 
62 
Cisco Linksys E4200
46.9 
61.4 
D-Link DIR-657
39.2 
60 
D-Link DIR-825
40.4 
57.44 
Belkin N+ Wireless Router
29.44 
55.44 
Netgear WNDR3700
38.6 
54.8 
LaCie Wireless Space
19.8 
53.4 
D-Link DIR-645
24.5 
51.3 
D-Link DIR-655
38.4 
50.6 
Securifi Almond
16.8 
45.9 
Cisco Linksys E3000
32.8 
43.5 
D-Link DIR-605L
36.8 
40.8 
Linksys WRT610N
28.8 
35.76 
Apple Time Capsule
20.8 
32.2 

Conclusion
With average performance and a buggy Web interface, the Securifi Almond would still be a great router if it cost half its current price. For now, it makes an OK router with a novel touch screen that doesn't justify its price tag, mostly because with routers, you generally only need to configure once.

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Quick Specifications See All

  • Data Transfer Rate 300 Mbps
  • Connectivity Technology wired